OK nobody panic until Margaret gives the word (Updated)

As in Margaret Orr over at WDSU Channel 6, the only NOLA TeeVee station that provides weather information for the good folks in Hancock and Pearl River Counties Mississippi. Being in the New Orleans TeeVee market is a net plus IMHO except during Hurricane type events but the good folks in meteorology at WDSU make sure their peeps in Mississippi are taken care of in stark contrast to Fox 8 and WWL TeeVee, who evidently do not give a rats ass about the peeps in Mississippi during bad weather events.

Of yeah, the reason we may wish to put panic on deck:

THE BROAD AREA OF LOW PRESSURE IN THE NORTHWESTERN CARIBBEAN SEA IS MOVING TOWARD THE WEST-NORTHWEST AT 10 TO 15 MPH. CLOUDINESS AND SHOWERS ASSOCIATED WITH THIS LOW CONTINUE TO SHOW SIGNS OF ORGANIZATION…AND A TROPICAL DEPRESSION COULD FORM BEFORE THE DISTURBANCE REACHES THE YUCATAN PENINSULA ON THURSDAY. AFTER THAT…THIS WEATHER SYSTEM IS FORECAST TO MOVE OVER THE GULF OF MEXICO…WHERE UPPER-LEVEL WINDS WILL LIKELY BE A LITTLE LESS FAVORABLE FOR DEVELOPMENT. THIS SYSTEM HAS A HIGH CHANCE…60 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS…AND A HIGH CHANCE…70 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS.

Those of you not following Margaret on twitter should do so immediately.

Update NHC 8-14-13 7PMCST:

THE LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM IN THE NORTHWESTERN CARIBBEAN SEA IS MOVING TOWARD THE WEST-NORTHWEST AT 10 MPH…AND IS PRODUCING WIND GUSTS TO GALE FORCE IN SQUALLS TO THE EAST OF THE CENTER. ASSOCIATED SHOWER AND THUNDERSTORM ACTIVITY CONTINUES TO SHOW SIGNS OF ORGANIZATION…AND A TROPICAL DEPRESSION COULD FORM BEFORE THE DISTURBANCE REACHES THE YUCATAN PENINSULA ON THURSDAY. AFTER THAT…THE LOW IS FORECAST TO MOVE INTO THE SOUTHERN GULF OF MEXICO…WHERE UPPER-LEVEL WINDS COULD BECOME A LITTLE LESS FAVORABLE FOR DEVELOPMENT. THIS SYSTEM HAS A HIGH CHANCE…70 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS…AND A HIGH CHANCE…80 PERCENT…OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS. REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT A TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMS…HEAVY RAINS AND GUSTY WINDS ARE FORECAST TO SPREAD OVER THE YUCATAN PENINSULA…WESTERN CUBA…AND BELIZE DURING THE NEXT DAY OR TWO…AND INTERESTS IN THESE AREAS SHOULD MONITOR THE PROGRESS OF THIS DISTURBANCE.

OK you rumor mongering freaks, Jim Cantore is not in Biloxi

According to today’s Sun Herald the rumor Jim Cantore is at the Hard Rock has popped up again, last time being when Hurricane Gustav was in the Gulf. It is beyond dumb and frankly based upon my track record you’d better be scared of where ol’ Sop decides to ride out a storm moreso than Cantore, who did manage to pick a spot for Katrina that was not far from my place in Gulfport back in 2005. 😉 With a H/T to the S/H the Weather Channel rolled out the following commercial last summer that is too funny:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48r4IQTB3NE

Then again Mr Bill’s PSC on the topic pre Katrina was also spot on: Continue reading “OK you rumor mongering freaks, Jim Cantore is not in Biloxi”

Slabbed Daily June 1, 2009: Hurricane Season / Toxic Paper Edition

Save your life and evacuate. Or stay to make certain your wind insurance pays. Decisions decisions….

Its that time of the year – the beginning of another Hurricane season complete with advance news stories why our insurance rates need to rise yet again. Some evac stories always make it to the mix and it is there we start with this Melissa Scallan Sun Herald story:

Womack and other state officials are encouraging residents to go north, not east or west and to leave by alternate rather than primary routes, such as U.S. 49.

Some of the new and less-traveled routes include Mississippi 605 and Mississippi 67, which tie into each other and lead to U.S. 49. Wayne Brown, Southern District transportation commissioner for the state Department of Transportation, encourages residents to take highways such as Mississippi 15, 57, 63 and 29.

“If people stick to those, in my opinion, they’ll have much less traffic to deal with,” Brown said.

The state has agreed again this year to allow south Louisiana residents to use Mississippi interstates to evacuate.

If asked by Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, Mississippi will contraflow interstates 55 and 59, which means traffic in all lanes will flow north.

On I-55 contraflow will end just south of Brookhaven. On I-59 it will end just south of Hattiesburg.

Some exits will be open so motorists can get gas and food, Brown said, but those could be closed intermittently.

“We’re going to let them get off, but if that stop becomes congested we’ll close the exit,” he said.

Bob Chapman, emergency services manager for MDOT, said contraflow is one reason department officials encourage Mississippi residents to leave as early as they can.

“We can’t contraflow U.S. 49 for our residents because there are too many access points,” he said.

“The main emphasis is to evacuate early and go where you want to go.”

Next up is the obligatory Insurance (Mis) Infortmation Institute’s annual news plant explaining that costly Hurricanes are the reason rates are so expensive. What the story fails to mention is that insurers are paying out less in claims as a percenatge of their revenues than ever thus losses can’t be the true reason rates are sky high, coverage is scarce despite III’s paid shill Robert Hartwig’s protestations to the contrary. We pick up the AP story as published by the Houston Chronicle (h/t Mrs Sop): Continue reading “Slabbed Daily June 1, 2009: Hurricane Season / Toxic Paper Edition”

Ok Everyone Lets Panic and Raise Insurance Rates Again: 2008 Hurricane Forecast is Out

I have seen the end of the world once. So for whatever reason NOAA’s forecast doesn’t scare me. The new generator needs to run some anyhow and Lord knows the powerline workers could use the overtime. Plus since the gird is offline we’d be saving fossil fuels. 😉

Here is the WLOX story.

Government forecasters expect the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season to be near normal or above normal.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials in Tampa say that means there is a 60 to 70 percent chance of 12 to 16 named storms, six to nine hurricanes and two to five major hurricanes forming. But they stress coastal residents should always be prepared. They don’t predict whether, where or when any of these storms may hit land.

An average season has 11 named storms, including six hurricanes for which two reach major status.