There is a Heebe in the levee pile! Matt at Fix the pumps reveals continuing problems with substandard levee construction.

Susan Poag / The Times Picayune

Something starts to emerge from these reports: the River Birch pits are very, very bad. We’ve seen the possibility of it in the WBV-14b.2 reports above, we’ve seen it mentioned definitely in the WBV-14a.2 reports – also above – and we’ve seen it mentioned in the WBV-14c.2 reports earlier. Now it shows up in the most recent inspection report from project WBV-14e.2.

Yeah, what Matt said! Matt McBride at Fix the Pumps has added a 4th and 5th part to his continuing series on what appears to be substandard levee construction featuring dirt from the borrow pits of Sierra Club approved River Birch Landfill. (I’ll be circling back to the sold out sum bitches at the Sierra Club in another post.) His work on this topic, a vital one for those on the West Bank of Greater NOLA metro, is simply excellent. So much so that Paul Rioux picked up coverage for the T-P in fact.  We need to address one particular part of Rioux’s story so here is the salient snippet: Continue reading “There is a Heebe in the levee pile! Matt at Fix the pumps reveals continuing problems with substandard levee construction.”

getting a few words edgewise – cats, claims standards, levees, mitigation, perils, profits, providence, termites, and others that come to mind

As one might guess, the title of this post was inspired by my bulging drafts file and the incredible interest in Sop’s coverage of what first appeared a simple case of insurance lagniappe in Jefferson Parish.

First up, a collection of news stories that remind us risk is not limited to the states on the Gulf Coast.

Feb. Snow Storms Designated CATS, Insured Loss Exceeds $2 B

Two snow storms that hit the United States this month will cause insured damages in excess of $2 billion, according to a catastrophe risk modeling firm…Meanwhile, Gary Kerney, assistant vice president of  Property Claim Services, a unit of Insurance Services Office in Jersey City, N.J., said he expects PCS to have loss estimates for the storms sometime next week. He said PCS is classifying both storms as catastrophes, meaning each storm should have insured losses in excess of $25 million.

"Insurer Zurich noted that snow has been present in 49 of 50 states in the past week, and some states not used to facing this risk could be exposed to losses."

AIR Worldwide issued a statement on Feb. 10…noting that business interruption is likely to be another major driver of insured losses. Regarding roof collapse claims, Tim Doggett, principal scientist, AIR, said the combined storms could cause havoc for roofs, particularly light metal, long span, low slope and flat roofs.

According to the Insurance Information Institute, winter storms are the third-largest cause of catastrophe losses, behind hurricanes and tornadoes, and result in about $1 billion in insured losses each year. I.I.I. said winter storms resulted in more than $7 billion in insured losses from 1999-2008.

Well, &#*% happens, snow melts, and levees may fail to provide protection from flooding.

New data released by Levees.Org shows that the majority of U.S. population lives in counties protected by levees, and that those counties are wealthier.

While the hurricane barrier protecting Providence, Rhode Island isn’t what we traditionally think of a levee, the folks there came up with a plan to save millions without giving up their protection – Feds take over hurricane barrier; Title handed to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers:

Providence officials estimate the transfer will save the city $500,000 annually and millions more in upkeep over the course of the coming years…In addition [to the legislation authorizing the transfer], [U.S. Senator Jack] Reed helped secure $4 million in federal funding for the Corps to make repairs to the barrier’s pumping system and has arranged nearly $1 million to operate the barrier over the last two years.

Mississippi may not be the only place termites cause problems for homeowner attempting to meet higher elevation requirements and Continue reading “getting a few words edgewise – cats, claims standards, levees, mitigation, perils, profits, providence, termites, and others that come to mind”