A Con Artist is Running for Southern District PSC: We know her as Sugar Stallings

Sugar Stallings via  WLOX File Photo
Sugar Stallings via
WLOX File Photo
What started as a tip that a local radio personality/political candidate was pretending to be a lawyer has morphed into something more and that started when Slabbed obtained Southern District PSC candidate Demetria M “Sugar” Stallings resume from the Biloxi City Council minutes when former Biloxi Mayor AJ Holloway appointed Stallings to the Historical Preservation Commission:

Sugar Stallings CV by on Scribd

It was with that detailed information that Slabbed started doing some sleuthing with the University of Baltimore and the University of Maryland but the initial searches turned up dry. Summer Selby-Drew stopped in with a tip which we were already wise, namely that Stallings may not be her original last name and Sugar is a nickname. Having already run a public records search we knew that Stallings was known in Maryland as Demetria M. Brown. The Baltimore Sun circa 2006 made that bit of sleuthing easy: Continue reading “A Con Artist is Running for Southern District PSC: We know her as Sugar Stallings”

Are Unlicensed Lay People Using the Courtesy Title “Esquire” Tantamount to the Unauthorized Practice of Law?

The answer to that depends on the state in which you live and is incredibly nuanced. For example back in the 1990s the City New York Bar Association Ethics Committee found the term esquire, over time referred “commonly and exclusively” to lawyers. That same committee also found that “based on common usage it is fair to state that if the title appears after a person’s name, that person may be presumed to be a lawyer.”

I’m not a lawyer but I agree with logic. For example seeing the name Jane Doe followed by “,Esq.” would lead most folks to conclude the person was a lawyer. There are some states that take that notion seriously. The Ohio Supreme Court’s Board of Commissioners on Grievances and Discipline prohibited a lawyer who was not licensed to practice law in the state from appending Esq. to his signature on business correspondence because it was deemed to connote licensure in Ohio. (Ohio S. Ct. Opinion 91-24 (1991).)

I found another example on the ABA website page styled Use of Esq. by Non-Lawyers a commenter pointed out that: Continue reading “Are Unlicensed Lay People Using the Courtesy Title “Esquire” Tantamount to the Unauthorized Practice of Law?”