Here is a 4 pack of stories that are related just under the surface…….

If you are not from this area like Angela Rouse at the KC Star, and you can get the connection you’ll earn an associate membership in the Slabbed Nation.

Bob Warren at the Times Picayune profiles Sean Payton’s new gated community in the DFW metroplex, a place Louisiana expats describe as a soulless city.

The Sun Herald does an excellent job weaving the War of 1812 and the Louisiana purchase with the Hurricane of 1812 as University of South Carolina Geographer Cary Mock has recreated the storm’s path. Turns out I previously opined on Slabbed that a strike from the southeast would be devastating to the City and as it so happened such a strike was indeed devastating to the City.  Here is a snippet from the story as told by the Orleans Gazette:

“The levee almost entirely destroyed; the beach covered from fragments of vessels, merchandize (sic), trunks, and here and there Continue reading “Here is a 4 pack of stories that are related just under the surface…….”

“not to belabor the point” – just another look at Katrina’s wind and flood water on the McIntosh property: a Rigsby qui tam update

In light of State Farm’s attempt to exclude the testimony of the Rigsbys’ expert witnesses, SLABBED revisits the data documenting Katrina’s wind and flood water on the McIntosh property.   As Sop’s “USA Ex Rel Rigsby v State Farm: An analysis of the McIntosh Claim: Updating the original post Not to belabor the pointpointed out, “There was around 2 feet of water inside the[McIntosh] residence when the storm surge peaked in the Biloxi Bay several hours after Hurricane force winds began blowing.

NOAA shows the McIntosh property was subjected to “F2 or greater Eyewall Winds” (page 50).

How powerful are F2 Eyewall Winds? Continue reading ““not to belabor the point” – just another look at Katrina’s wind and flood water on the McIntosh property: a Rigsby qui tam update”

Ok Everyone Lets Panic and Raise Insurance Rates Again: 2008 Hurricane Forecast is Out

I have seen the end of the world once. So for whatever reason NOAA’s forecast doesn’t scare me. The new generator needs to run some anyhow and Lord knows the powerline workers could use the overtime. Plus since the gird is offline we’d be saving fossil fuels. 😉

Here is the WLOX story.

Government forecasters expect the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season to be near normal or above normal.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officials in Tampa say that means there is a 60 to 70 percent chance of 12 to 16 named storms, six to nine hurricanes and two to five major hurricanes forming. But they stress coastal residents should always be prepared. They don’t predict whether, where or when any of these storms may hit land.

An average season has 11 named storms, including six hurricanes for which two reach major status.