Drew Broach takes a nostalgic trip down wrinkled robe lane as the Times Picayune profiles recently released internal FBI records.

The Times Picayune went above and beyond in their FOIA based 4 year investigation into Team FBI and Operation Wrinkled Robe, a 9 year saga that concluded with the impeachment last year of Federal District Court Judge Tom pOrteous. We’ve written extensively on both the investigation and last year’s impeachment proceedings with my Bell Cow post on Wrinkled Robe itself found here with Nowdy’s combo Wrinkled Robe/Porteous/Shaved genitalia masterpiece here. Today T-P editor Drew Broach nicely adds to the extensive body of knowledge that is Operation Wrinkled Robe with his report on FBI investigation papers which includes some interactive graphics and the FOIA response itself. It is simply very well done.

Some of the names mentioned should be very familiar to Slabbed lifers in Kenner’s Skip Hand and Steve Mortillaro, later termed deadhead employees by Aaron Broussard’s replacement Steve Theriot. But we also learn that the investigation also went on location in Biloxi twice as the Marcotte’s bought the judges rooms at the Beau Rivage.

Most interesting is how the whole thing started with a tip from a disgruntled competitor of Louis Marcotte to the Metropolitan Crime Commission, the same folks that filed the ethics complaint against Aaron Broussard for making parish venders rent his vacation property at the Trout Point development in Nova Scotia.  Ol’ Aaron has since began selling his Canadian holdings including his beloved River Bend Lodge, which was sold earlier this year to Charles Leary and Vaughn Perret of Trout Point Lodge infamy.

I mention all this because all it takes is a tip to start something far larger. Continue reading “Drew Broach takes a nostalgic trip down wrinkled robe lane as the Times Picayune profiles recently released internal FBI records.”

Putting in the fix and giving them the Feldman Part 2: Slabbed explores the seemingly foreign concept of recusal in the Louisiana Eastern District Federal Courts as we tie a few more things together.

Subsection 455(b)(4) requires disqualification where a judge “knows that he, individually or as a fiduciary, or his spouse or minor child residing in his household, has a financial interest in the subject matter in controversy or in a party to the proceeding, or any other interest that could be substantially affected by the outcome of the proceeding.” Section 455(d)(4) defines “financial interest” for the purposes of section 455(b), and provides specific exemptions, such as investment in a mutual fund or ownership of government securities. Note that, apart from such exemptions, even the smallest financial interest (e.g., ownership of a single share of stock) requires recusal. It is a judge’s duty to keep abreast of all of his or her financial interests.

Te above text from Recusal: Analysis of Case Law Under 28 U.S.C. §§ 455 & 144 found at the Federal Judicial Center has provided us with a treasure trove of information. As is often the case what appear to be unrelated events in Louisiana there are often common roots.  My research on the landmark recusal case I cited yesterday on Jim Brown’s Common Sense, Liljeberg v Health Services Acquisition Corporation led to this post which is also one heck of a story, one that will bring us from that case in the 1980s to the current impeachment of disgraced Louisiana Eastern District Court Federal Judge Tom Porteous and several points in between.

We need to catch our readers up to a key concept that we’ve highlighted several times here on Slabbed in the concept of control in politics and the judiciary. Many times those that run for office or nominated for judgeships are mere lackeys for monied interests. A very wealthy South Mississippian that is well respected in the business community told me something long ago that introduced me to the concept:

Some people want money. Some people want the power. I always wanted money because money rents power. Continue reading “Putting in the fix and giving them the Feldman Part 2: Slabbed explores the seemingly foreign concept of recusal in the Louisiana Eastern District Federal Courts as we tie a few more things together.”