Dirty deeds done dirt cheap: Slabbed explores the genesis of the Trout Point Development and certain land sales to Aaron Broussard and his cronies.

Trout Point Lodge Owners Vaughn Perret, Danny Abel and Charles Leary

July 22, 2001 Sunday
Nova Scotia Nirvana; Trout Point Lodge is rich in Louisiana roots, an hour from the Evangeline Trail, co-owned by New Orleanians who used to make cheese at the north shore’s Chicory Farm. But it’s decidedly Canadian, an unparalleled wilderness experience in the lap of luxury.BYLINE: By Millie Ball; Travel editor
SECTION: TRAVEL; Pg. 1
LENGTH: 2229 words

EAST KEMPTVILLE, NOVA SCOTIA — Once a month, from May through October, New Orleans lawyer Daniel Abel catches a flight to Maine and then a boat to Yarmouth, a town at the southern tip of Nova Scotia. By the next morning, Abel has settled into another week-long stay at Trout Point Lodge. It’s his idea of heaven. Others agree, including Food and Wine magazine, which raved about it last month. The 10-bedroom lodge is surrounded by 200 acres of spruce and pine and birch and maple trees and overlooks the Tusket River and a pond that reflects the clouds and skies above Nova Scotia. The interior is Metropolitan Home rustic, with kilim rugs and furniture crafted from tree branches. The comforting smell of earlier fires that crackled in the many fireplaces mingles with fresh scent of spruce logs that were trucked in to build the lodge.

Abel’s one of the owners. He knows how to find Trout Point, which isn’t easy. It’s an hour north of Yarmouth and an hour east of the Evangeline Trail, the heart of Acadian Nova Scotia.

“Go past East Kemptville to East Kemptville Road” — a dirt road, by the way — “then turn at the lodge sign and follow the electrical wires to the end,” said Vaughn Perret, Abel’s business partner with Charles Leary. Perret was talking on a cell phone that kept fading in and out.

Perret and Leary run the lodge, now in its second season, as well as a nearby cheese dairy farm similar to their last project, the north shore’s Chicory Farm, which gained some renown in the mid-1990s.

So said Millie Ball way back in 2001, This is important for several reasons, one of which I can’t speak about on the advice of my attorney but before I get to that we need to visit with Millie’s travel piece for the Times Picayune a bit more: Continue reading “Dirty deeds done dirt cheap: Slabbed explores the genesis of the Trout Point Development and certain land sales to Aaron Broussard and his cronies.”

I just had the most amazing conversation with the Lafayette Square Wino….

I’m coughing like I have TB but when the Wino calls I gotta take it.  “You’re doing a better job since I busted your chops on Meffert’s plea deal”, he said, “but is something you need to know….”

And talk we did but there is one problem, beyond being able to disclose that we received a great deal of additional color on Lawrence Chehardy’s untimely departure from the office of the Jefferson Parish Tax Assessor there isn’t much I can publish at this time.  (I know that sucks)

I will say this, I’ve again had a knowledgable observer explain how the DoJ is the fly in the ointment when it comes to some of these very obvious cases of public corruption down here. Holding case files until the statute of limitation expires is one way this is done. An understaffed US Attorney’s office is another way the public is cheated of justice as it is when valuable resources are wasted on political prosecutions like the one involving our own Ashton O’Dwyer.

Like with the crime cameras and Sean Alfortish, civil litigation could well force Mr Letten’s hand in some of these other matters. Continue reading “I just had the most amazing conversation with the Lafayette Square Wino….”

“Well, kiss my assessor” – James Gill on the retirement of Lawrence Chehardy

I missed Gill’s column in Wednesday’s Times Picayune (which isn’t all I’ve missed over the holidays) and, then, the spam filter caught the email tip sent by a reader – but no one should miss reading, Assessing a lifetime in Jeff politics:

Lawrence Chehardy’s retirement after 34 years as Jefferson Parish assessor brings to mind the Samuel Johnson crack: “That fellow seems to me to possess but one idea, and that is a wrong one.”

Chehardy’s wrong idea — that the homestead exemption should not only be retained but periodically raised — certainly resonated with the voters, however. It did not originate with him but came with the job, which he landed 34 years ago in a triumph of nepotism over democracy.

Daddy, the wildly popular long-term incumbent, drew no challengers when he came up for re-election until his 22-year-old law-student son turned up clutching his qualification papers with minutes to spare.

The mantle was passed seamlessly. Chehardy pere had appropriated the homestead exemption as his signature issue and parlayed it into a position atop the parish’s political establishment, where he and then-District Attorney John Mamoulides stuffed the courts with their protégés.

The elder Chehardy himself waltzed into a seat on the state court of appeal, while his heir took over as the exemption’s most vocal proponent, winning re-election hands down ever since.

The most bizarre aspect of the story is Continue reading ““Well, kiss my assessor” – James Gill on the retirement of Lawrence Chehardy”