Built on the twin lies of Sunshine and “Robust”: Boss Hoggs promises on the State Port at Gulfport nothing more than hot air

One of the larger post Katrina rebuilding stories here on the coast was then Governor Haley “Boss Hogg” Barbour and his economic development people diverting over $500 million dollars of recovery money meant to build housing for displaced storm victims to build “The Port of the Future” at the State Port in Gulfport. Wild promises of the port’s potential were made and I highlighted some of those promises in this post way back in 2008 where coastal residents were promised sunshine in the process due to the doubts many local area residents were harboring way back in 2008 when the money was diverted.

I mention all this because while I have been neck deep with my gabby cousin Slabb O’Leak, Anita Lee over at the Sun Herald blew the port’s BS out of the water this week because it turns out those plans Boss Hogg so publicly touted have been revealed to be BS and the locals are furious. This could well grow into a major scandal and it is my hope the OIG from HUD and possibly the Office of the Attorney General take a peeksie at how the recovery money was diverted, based promises that have since proven to be fictitious since the federal government may well have been misled.

That said I hope it is lost on no one the same political power brokers out of Jackson that brought us the port disaster have already annointed career politician and legacy political hack Billy Hewes as the next Mayor, almost a full year ahead of the election. Now for some links to various stories by the Sun Herald’s Anita Lee on the subject:

Leaders, community frustrated by port plans, progress

Gulfport councilman calls for change at port

MDOT commissioner talks connector road, tolls and curbing travel

The bottom line is the farther out from Katrina we travel, the more tarnished Haley Barbour’s legacy becomes as his empty promises continue to float to the surface.

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The Sun Herald Remembers Katrina plus 5: Katrina anniversary coverage miscellany

John Fitzhugh / The Sun Herald

The Sun Herald has extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina for the 5th anniversary of the storm. Here is a quick roundup: 

State Senator David Baria, who represents Katrina ground zero, wrote an excellent guest Op-Ed for the Sun Herald. He covers the insurance problems and the failure of the state’s leadership to solve the problems with the dysfunctional wind insurance market and how that has hindered our post storm recovery. He points out the 6 coastal counties supply 35% of the state’s tax revenues which makes our insurance problem a state wide problem. 

Tammy Smith looks back on one million coast Katrina recovery volunteers (and counting) and chronicles a group on the coast now from Bucks County Pennsylvania.  The good people in Bucks and Montgomery Counties Pennsylvania have true angels for the people in Hancock County since the storm. Continue reading “The Sun Herald Remembers Katrina plus 5: Katrina anniversary coverage miscellany”

SLABBED (not exactly) Daily – August 5, 2010

On a slow news day – or a day when it’s not so hot – any one of these stories could take an entire post to cover.  However, today is neither and without going further, here is news you can use:

Making a diagnosis of “improper influence” requires a scalpel, not a sledgehammer. Not only is it unrealistic to think we can eradicate all judicial biases, instincts, leanings or interests, however termed, but it is also unwise. We want our judges to live in the real world, so that they can bring their life experiences and common sense to the table when deciding cases. Judges must remain “partial” to some influences, therefore, like the case law, and controlling statutes, and perhaps even basic standards of decency and morality, too. As The New York Times recently cited, former Chief Justice William Rehnquist’s view on recusal was that if a justice’s mind was “a complete tabula rasa” in relevant respects, it “would be evidence of lack of qualification, not lack of bias.”

While I hope you’ll follow all the links, but by all means, read this opinion post on recusal from Law.com.

  • Staying with matters of public policy for the moment, let’s talk unemployment rates. Online news is filled with stories like this about the uptick in unemployment rates – and all appear to have been written by someone clueless about the issue.

Here’s a clue – anyone reporting on the increase should start by defining “seasonal”. Continue reading “SLABBED (not exactly) Daily – August 5, 2010”