Behind door #2 – Come on down State Farm Bank (the good neighbor, the good customer, and the Rigsby qui tam)

You see, State Farm has a bank. A thrift to be exact. And it likes to offer loans, and other banking products to its insurance customers. But the people that they do this through are not employees of State Farm. They are the various independent agents (as State Farm likes to call them) that run State Farm offices.

Russell introduced State Farm’s Bank so well in  A different State Farm Battle (January 2008) that it seemed appropriate to give it another run.  It should come as no surprise that State Farm’s website has a more formal introduction (another h/t to Steve):

State Farm Bank, F.S.B. received formal approval for a thrift charter from the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS) in November 1998 and is generally referred to as “State Farm Bank®”. Its focus is on consumer-oriented financial products, complementing State Farm’s insurance focus on personal lines.

State Farm Bank is a nontraditional financial institution and does not have branch offices. The bulk of direct customer interaction and product assistance is provided by State Farm® agents, augmented by a telephone call center, mail and the Internet. As of December 31, 2005, the Bank held $12 billion in total assets.

Documents filed in Katrina litigation introduce State Farm’s Bank in a different light – suggesting just how nontraditional it may have been following the storm. In fact, the amended RICO complaint added the State Farm Bank as a Defendant:

… State Farm Bank is wholly-owned by State Farm Mutual, and is headquartered in Bloomington, Illinois.  As of March 21, 2003, State Farm Bank had assets totaling in excess of 5,000,000,000 (five billion) U.S. dollars.

State Farm Bank aided and abetted a civil conspiracy by providing substantial assistance in carrying out the civil conspiracy. State Farm Bank aided and abetted a civil conspiracy by committing one or more tortious acts in concert with State Farm, or pursuant to a common design, engaged in same with State Farm.

State Farm Bank knew that State Farm’s conduct in the civil conspiracy was a breach of duty to the Plaintiffs as insured policyholders, and yet the Defendants and each of them gave substantial assistance or encouragement to the scheme. State Farm Bank’s aiding and abetting a civil conspiracy to conduct corrupt property inspections and procure contrived inspection reports was a direct and proximate cause of damages sustained by Plaintiffs.

Interestingly, the Forensic Rebuttal to Relator’s Response to Motion for Clarification of Order Denying Motion for Summary Judgment ignores the obvious connection and steps over those issues to get to the Brian Ford deposition: Continue reading “Behind door #2 – Come on down State Farm Bank (the good neighbor, the good customer, and the Rigsby qui tam)”