A “fall” festival? Draper sentencing set in beef plant fiasco set for Halloween

James Draper was such a minor player in the beef plant case that I doubt few even know his name; yet, of all the folks involved, Draper is the one facing the longest sentence – and, if the government gets what it wants, his sentence will be even longer after the Halloween Day hearing. The Clarion-Ledger ran a brief update in today’s paper. h/t Phunk and Wagnalls

James Draper, convicted by a jury for his part in the Mississippi Beef Plant scandal, will be sentenced on Oct. 31. The government is asking Chief Judge Michael Mills to deal more harshly with Draper, a refrigerator salesman from Tennessee, than a pre-sentence report recommends.

Draper was convicted July 23 on two counts — aiding and abetting the interstate transportation of money obtained by fraud, and of money laundering — in bilking the state out of $187,725. The government filed a four-page motion Tuesday urging Mills to consider that Draper lied during his two-day trial in U.S. District Court.

Based on the charges against him, it would seem Draper had no information to trade for a lighter sentence – but there’s more to the story of this puzzling aspect of the beef plant case tan the  charges against Draper suggest: Continue reading “A “fall” festival? Draper sentencing set in beef plant fiasco set for Halloween”

A "fall" festival? Draper sentencing set in beef plant fiasco set for Halloween

James Draper was such a minor player in the beef plant case that I doubt few even know his name; yet, of all the folks involved, Draper is the one facing the longest sentence – and, if the government gets what it wants, his sentence will be even longer after the Halloween Day hearing. The Clarion-Ledger ran a brief update in today’s paper. h/t Phunk and Wagnalls

James Draper, convicted by a jury for his part in the Mississippi Beef Plant scandal, will be sentenced on Oct. 31. The government is asking Chief Judge Michael Mills to deal more harshly with Draper, a refrigerator salesman from Tennessee, than a pre-sentence report recommends.

Draper was convicted July 23 on two counts — aiding and abetting the interstate transportation of money obtained by fraud, and of money laundering — in bilking the state out of $187,725. The government filed a four-page motion Tuesday urging Mills to consider that Draper lied during his two-day trial in U.S. District Court.

Based on the charges against him, it would seem Draper had no information to trade for a lighter sentence – but there’s more to the story of this puzzling aspect of the beef plant case tan the  charges against Draper suggest: Continue reading “A "fall" festival? Draper sentencing set in beef plant fiasco set for Halloween”

Beef Plant Defendant Draper's Trial Set for Monday

The Sun Herald picked up this AP story on the Beef Plant saga:

A judge has denied Mississippi Beef Plant defendant James Draper’s request to dismiss part of his two-count indictment. 

Draper is set to go on trial Monday in federal court in Oxford.

He had asked the court to dismiss accusations he transported stolen property in interstate commerce – that he mailed a $167,725 check paid by stolen funds obtained fraudulently. Continue reading “Beef Plant Defendant Draper's Trial Set for Monday”

Beef Plant Trial of James Drapier Delayed So the Case is Well Done

Jimmy Gates at the Clarion Ledger has the story:

For the second time, the federal trial for a Tennessee refrigeration company sales representative charged with pocketing funds designated for equipment at the failed Mississippi Beef Processors plant in Oakland has been delayed.

The trial of James Draper of Mount Juliet, Tenn., had been scheduled for today in Oxford.

But U.S. District Judge Michael Mills has rescheduled the trial for July 21. The trial was originally set for May 9, but Draper’s attorney, Kenneth Coghlan, asked for a delay. No reason was given for the latest delay.

Draper is charged with devising a scheme to defraud the state of Mississippi and money laundering. Continue reading “Beef Plant Trial of James Drapier Delayed So the Case is Well Done”

USA v Moultrie updated

The Defense Motion requesting a Daubert Hearing has been added to USA v Moultrie in the left sidebar under Legal. The Motion conditions the request for a ruling during the trial and addresses the points made in the Government’s response in opposition to the Motion and related Exhibits.

We are checking the docket and will fill any gaps as well as continue to update the page if/as new items are added. h/t bellesouth.

…and with our super-deluxe indictment, you can brown your beef by the pool

Yet another amazing difference in USA v Moultrie and USA v Scruggs is the mutually agreed to take-all-the-time-you-need Motion for Continuation.

Well, it does get so very hot here in July and early August and it takes so much time to prepare for a really big case – months and months just to go through the government’s evidence and on certainly wouldn’t have time between now and the middle of June to prepare for two

Plus, if you’ve got a great place in Florida, you surely don’t want to spend your summer in Oxford and certainly not London – big tourist season, you know.

Judge Mills is just so much more understanding in warm weather. Good thing, too. When folks are given a short time to examine a truckload of evidence and have every motion denied, they often end up with a plea agreement – and we surely wouldn’t want that to happen, not here in the hospitality state, not with our super deluxe.

…and with our deluxe indictment, you can be “leaving on a jet plane”

Our home boys get the standard issue turn-in-your-passport indictment; but, hey, we’re the hospitality state and for our wealthy out-of-state indictees – folks like Robert Moultrie, we offer the deluxe.

Just show up, let us take your picture and you, too, can join your wife in London to celebrate her birthday.

Oh, and, if you’ve got a couple of old polygraph tests, be sure to drop those off on your way to the airport – and, hey, thanks for bringing your own evidence.

No doubt it’s somewhat insulting to be indicted over cull cows when the bulls at Moultrie Meadows are so fine they’ve got names – in fact, everything about Moultrie Meadows seems fine. Continue reading “…and with our deluxe indictment, you can be “leaving on a jet plane””

Pleas and fleas keep you scratching

Those speculating about pleas to come from USA v Moultrie and comparing the case to USA v Scruggs may find this perspective on pleading guilty of interest.

Some folks had an itch about Scruggs that they used his indictment to scratch. If there are any fleas on Musgrove, chances are there’ll be a lot more scratching in USA v Moultrie.

Given their history of covering the beef plant failure and tax payer loss, the Clarion-Ledger is certain to keep a focus on these latest developments – Salter alone has three blog posts going.

Georgia on my mind…

Before the ink had time to dry on the last plea in USA v Scruggs, the US Attorney for Northern Mississippi put a sacred cow in the pasture – USA v Moultrie – and boy does this one moo!

Three Georgia businessmen face a 16-count federal indictment involving the defunct Mississippi Beef Processors Plant, including allegations that their company tried to influence a Mississippi public official through campaign contributions. Continue reading “Georgia on my mind…”