The media in Nova Scotia pick up on the Broussard indictment and State Ethics Board Investigation.

I love local lore and history folks so the story in today’s SouthCoast Today on Aaron Broussard’s legal troubles and connections to Nova Scotia is right up my alley and ranks as a must read folks.  Here is a snippet:

On Februray 28, 1765, less than a month after being chased by the British government in Nova Scotia out of the colony for his murder, mutilation and scalping of hundreds of British subjects, famed Acadian firebrand Joseph Beausoliel Broussard stepped off a ship in New Orleans, where his progeny have multiplied and still reside. One of the most famous of those today is Aaron Broussard, alledgedly one of the most corrupt officials in a notably corrupt region…..

Read more at the SouthCoast Today.

sop

Sop gets a cyber first: Behavioral finance/economics intersects with Slabbed. An Aaron Broussard/Trout Point Lodge Update.

Some of my better received work here on Slabbed deals with the topic of behavioral finance/economics.  That said when my curiosity compelled me to enter the laboratory I invariably would go to the Yahoo Finance Boards and issues like Allstate or the pump and dump de jour such as XING.

Cerro Coyote has changed that folks and I want to give everyone a flavor for what I am seeing by communicating with people on this topic.  After all this blog is called Slabbed, a sizable portion of our readership was slabbed by Hurricane Katrina not that long ago. Before we get to “the finance” part of behavioral finance we must start with the behavioral. Universally the investors I have heard from share 3 common traits:

1. They were sold a small stake in Cerro Coyote as evidenced by the stock purchase agreement I posted here on Slabbed last year.
2. They have found out via Slabbed the Inn at Coyote Mountain, the major asset of Cerro Coyote has been sold.
3. They have not yet received anything back on their investment.

So what do people feel upon learn such information?  The answer lies in the Kübler-Ross model and Wiki does a very good job explaining it:

The Kübler-Ross model, commonly known as The Five Stages of Grief, was a theory first introduced by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross in her 1969 book, On Death and Dying. Continue reading “Sop gets a cyber first: Behavioral finance/economics intersects with Slabbed. An Aaron Broussard/Trout Point Lodge Update.”