The Slab Nation literally stretches from coast to coast as Truth in Justice tracks John Mamoulides

Our DC based chapter of Slabbed is especially vibrant folks as DC based lawyer James Scanlan at Truth in Justice contacted us with an interesting post on the Truth in Justice files blog.  Truth in Justice is an “organization and website founded to educate the public about the criminal conviction of wholly innocent people.”  I suspect that mission also entails running across the guilty that have neither been convicted nor incarcerated and that is the case here IMHO.

Rather than reinvent the wheel I’m simply going to link James’ post on Thomas T. Demery of HUD, which looks to be a classic case of a taxpayer fleecing of the type that has the country broke today. What makes Demery interesting to us is the Mamo connection and this blurb:

In January 2006, when Barrett was forced, against his will, to shut down the investigation, it had expended $22,750,000 – some of that, according to an Acknowledgment included in Barrett’s report (at sixth page), paid to John Mamoulides (who retired from his district attorney position in 1996). While for a time some observers supported Barrett’s claims that a cover-up had thwarted his investigation, the prevailing view was probably closer to that of former Justice Department official Robert S. Litt (now General Counsel of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence), who in a May 21, 2005 letter described the investigation as “one of the most embarrassingly incompetent and wasteful episodes in the history of American law enforcement.”

James has a timeline here that is also very good.

We’re hoping our readers can help put more meat on the Mamo connection in comments.

sop

30 thoughts on “The Slab Nation literally stretches from coast to coast as Truth in Justice tracks John Mamoulides

  1. telemachus

    I’m going to admit I’m having some trouble following the allegations from afar…. but Mamo had at least one prior fling of a scandal involving HUD.

    Because I’m a bit tuckered I’m gonna just post these in entirety if that’s ok. A couple notes:

    It looks like this is all the work of James Gill when he was on staff, as opposed to jthe op-ed guy we all know now. His experience in JP goes way back.

    Jacob Karno is a guy I posted on elsewhere here a while back, the Karno name goes back in the New Orleans mafia and the current Judge Rebecca Olivier is/was (nee) a Karno.

    ******************************************

    5.12.96 TP:

    “”AAA BUILDING A 10-story office tower in Metairie built in 1972 by Jefferson Parish developer Tom Lattie, who later developed two residential subdivisions with Mamoulides . PHOTO THE BOTTOM LINE: The failure of this investment hit the large and small. The lender took a $3 million loss, while the building’s unsecured creditors got stuck with $262,000 in unpaid bills. The mess even touched Louisiana insurance customers: the state’s guaranty fund had to come up with another $1 million to pay policyholder claims when Mamoulides ‘ company couldn’t repay a $1 million loan to a failed insurer. HOW MAMOULIDES GOT INVOLVED: Several months after Doug Allen and Carl Eberts purchased the AAA Building for $3.3 million in 1978, Mamoulides joined the partnership. The partnership borrowed $5.1 million against the property from General American Life Insurance of St. Louis in 1979. THE DEAL: Mamoulides and his partners sold and rebought the building several times over the next 12 years. With these sales the book value of the property increased from $3.3 million to $10.75 million. However, most of the deals were financed with little or no cash. In most cases, the sellers simply accepted promissory notes from the buyers. WHAT WENT WRONG: The New Orleans office market collapsed due to declining oil prices in the mid-1980s, and the AAA Building was one of the casualties. While the office tower brought in about $1.4 million in rent a year, that was not enough to cover expenses, even after General American agreed to sharply reduce the property’s interest payments. A Mamoulides company, which became the sole owner of the building in the early 1990s, defaulted on the $5.1 million loan to General American in July 1992 after three years of losses on the property. NOTEWORTHY: Though the office building was a money-loser, Frances Pecora bought the property in 1989 for $10 million, of which about $4 million was cash. Pecora counted the property’s artifically high book-value as an asset of her troubled insurance company, Certified Lloyd’s, to make it appear solvent when it wasn’t, state regulators later said. Shortly before Certified was seized by the state in 1991, regulators allowed Pecora to transfer the building back to Mamoulides ‘ company, which paid no money but assumed $7.3 million in mortgages. Then- insurance commissioner Hunter Wagner recently acknowledged that the department, which was concerned at the time about Certified Lloyd’s solvency, could have insisted that Mamoulides pay at least $200,000 in cash to take over the building. Several parish consulting firms rented space in Mamoulides ‘ building. Among the tenants: Camp, Dresser & McKee, Gulf Systems and Dixon & Cunningham. THE FALLOUT: General American sued to foreclose on the property in 1993. One day before the building was scheduled to be sold at federal auction, the Mamoulides company that owned the building sought bankruptcy court protection for his investment. After Mamoulides ‘ company failed to find a new source of financing for the building, the bankruptcy court judge allowed General American to foreclose on the building. It was sold at auction for $3 million in 1994. ============================================================= DESTREHAN INDUSTRIAL PARK A 46-lot commercial subdivision near the Harvey Canal across from Woodmere Elementary School. PHOTO THE BOTTOM LINE: Mamoulides defaulted on a $218,000 loan and a company which he controlled defaulted on a $240,800 loan. The company lost 10 lots to a bank that foreclosed on property the firm had pledged. In addition, over a three-year period the land changed hands at least three times among Mamoulides and his associates. When First National Bank of Jefferson foreclosed, the debt was three times the market value of the property that secured the loan. HOW MAMOULIDES GOT INVOLVED: In February 1983, a Mamoulides -controlled company called Commercial Resources Consulants, Inc., bought 16 lots with frontage on Destrehan Avenue for $420,000 in cash from Dr. James Dudley Day. For the next four years, the land swapped hands in a series of transactions, though it was back in the hands of Mamoulides or his company when two banks foreclosed. THE DEAL: The land was sold or traded among Mamoulides , Commercial Resources, the late Public Service Commissioner George Ackel and Gordon Konrad, then an assistant district attorney who later, in an unrelated transaction, as head of Robco, sold Jefferson Parish $5 million worth of canal bottoms, including some the parish now claims it already owned. WHAT WENT WRONG: The property was never developed, so there was no income to cover the debt. Mamoulides and his wife defaulted on a $218,000 loan from Pontchartrain State Bank that Konrad had also guaranteed. Pontchartrain failed and the FDIC shut it down in 1991. An Illinois bank assigned to handle some of the accounts sued all three parties in November 1993, saying they owed $287,100 in principal and interest. Commercial Resources Consultants defaulted on a $240,800 loan from First National Bank of Jefferson from May 1989. The bank sued in April 1994, saying $389,200, including interest and fees, was owed. The shaky 1980s real estate market took a toll, and banks had lent more money than the property was worth at foreclosure. The highest of three appraisals done for the First National Bank of Jefferson foreclosure in 1994, for example, suggested the 10 lots were worth about one-third of the outstanding debt from the 1989 loan. NOTEWORTHY: One time, a swap handed Mamoulides valuable land that he turned around the same day. A month after Mamoulides ‘ company first bought the land in 1983, Konrad traded 10 lots in the Shrewsbury subdivision on Causeway Boulevard for 14 lots Mamoulides ‘ Commercial Resources owned in Destrehan Industrial Park. The same day, Commercial Resources sold the Shrewsbury parcel to Texaco for $353,000. It is not clear how much the lots Mamoulides gave up were worth at the time of the trade. But 11 years later, the highest of three appraisals done for a foreclosure said the still-vacant Destrehan lots traded to Konrad were then worth about $11,000 each, or roughly $150,000. THE FALLOUT: The lawsuit over the Pontchartrain State Bank loan in default was settled in July 1995, on the eve of a trial in the 24th Judicial District Court in Gretna. The terms were not disclosed. First National Bank of Jefferson foreclosed on the lots Commercial Resources had pledged and the bank’s successor, Hibernia National Bank, still owns several of them. Mamoulides still own several parcels, but the property remains undeveloped, a heavily wooded area without streets. ============================================================= LAKE RAMSEY A 300-lot residential subdivision aimed at upscale buyers. Advertising touted a planned health spa, tennis court, swimming pool, and bike paths. PHOTO THE BOTTOM LINE: Lot buyers said they’ve been trying to get Mamoulides on the phone for years in order to untangle the mess brought about when the development stalled in the late-1980s. Unresolved litigation and a substandard sewage system have put a chokehold on the project. In December, the St. Tammany Police Jury imposed a building moratorium until the matter is sorted out in court. HOW MAMOULIDES GOT INVOLVED: In 1981, Intrepid, a company run by the late Jefferson Parish developer Tom Lattie, bought 561 acres surrounding Lake Ramsey from the Core family for $1.7 million. Bank examination reports identified Mamoulides as a co-developer with Lattie as early as 1982. By 1988, Mamoulides had formed his own company, Lake Lots Inc., to develop the property, according to court documents. THE DEAL: What some insiders called a grand plan ahead of its time buckled under a mountain of debt, and from the mid-1980s on, the developers were scrambling to get out from under it. To help keep the project afloat, the developers and their associates – or new companies they created – bought lots with money borrowed from Merchants Bank and Trust of Kenner and Enterprise Federal Savings and Loan of Marrero. WHAT WENT WRONG: The developers spent more than four years and large sums of money to dig a second, 200-acre lake at the development. As that work was wrapping up, the oil bust started to take its toll on the real estate market, which didn’t recover in St. Tammany Parish until the early 1990s. None of the touted amenities – including the health spa or the swimming pool – ever materialized. In fact, some lot buyers chipped in money a few years ago just to cut the grass. Mamoulides and Intrepid were short on cash. In 1985, banking examiners expressed concern over Mamoulides ‘ ability to make good on a $100,000 loan guarantee on behalf of Intrepid, which had defaulted on its loan. By 1988, when Mamoulides ‘ own loans from Merchants topped $300,000, examiners said Mamoulides ‘ financial position had become “very precarious.” NOTEWORTHY: In May 1990, Lake Lots Inc. – which now included Mamoulides and West Bank businessman Michael O’Brien – borrowed $3 million from the troubled Midwest Insurance Co., which was shut down by regulators the following year. Mamoulides used $850,000 of the money to pay off his debts. Hunter Wagner, who became insurance commissioner a year later, earned $18,500 for brokering the deal. Among those who bought lots in Lake Ramsey were: Jack Grant and his wife Jo Ellen ‘Jodie’ Grant. He is a former assistant district attorney who represents the School Board. She was an assistant district attorney at the time who became a judge in 1990. Other buyers: Jack Grant’s law partner Ernest Barrow, also a former assistant district attorney; Jerry Crawford, a member of the East Jefferson Hospital Board; and J. Robert Hoepffner, a former Mamoulides law partner who became a hearing officer in 1st Parish Court. THE FALLOUT: Lake Lots defaulted on the Midwest loan, and the Insurance Department sued to collect. In 1995, a judge held Mamoulides accountable for $3.2 million, including interest. The Insurance Department still has not collected on its judgment against Mamoulides , while Secor Bank – which obtained a $2.4 million judgment against Lake Lots – foreclosed on 157 lots and another 40 undeveloped acres in 1992. A Slidell company that bought Secor’s lots has sued Intrepid to settle the question of who owns the sewer system, which has exceeded its capacity. Mamoulides has claimed he owned the system and tried to get royalties for agreeing to sell it to the new developers, but the Slidell company disputes that claim. ============================================================= RIVER GLEN ESTATES A 125-acre residential subdivision outside Covington with about 70 lots, most of them over an acre. An adjacent 75-acre parcel is undeveloped. PHOTO THE BOTTOM LINE: Two banks involved in the residential real estate project failed. The St. Tammany businessman who sold to Mamoulides land for this project in 1979 says he still hasn’t been paid in full. Three loans made to Mamoulides associates who bought land from him or bought land from co-developers resulted in a loss of more than $1 million to Enterprise Federal Savings and Loan of Marrero, the RTC said in court papers, and ultimately taxpayers picked up some of the tab. HOW MAMOULIDES GOT INVOLVED: Mamoulides and his wife bought 125 acres from Richard Blossman in October 1979 for $500,000. In 1980, Blossman sold 75 adjacent acres to Intrepid, Inc., run by Tom Lattie. Intrepid and Mamoulides swapped their property in 1981, with Mamoulides also getting $90,000 in cash. THE DEAL: Two banks – Enterprise, run by Mamoulides ally and then – Jefferson Parish Council Chairman Robert Evans, and Merchants Bank & Trust of Kenner, where Mamoulides served on the board of directors – lent developers money for the project in transactions bank examiners and federal regulators later characterized as questionable. Many loans directly or indirectly benefitted Mamoulides , an early co-developer . WHAT WENT WRONG: Banks were too generous. A March 1985 state examiners report on Merchants Bank said lots in River Glen were selling for below the average price that the loan was based on. Enterprise lent Magna Homes of Baton Rouge $690,000 to buy the 75 undeveloped acres from Mamoulides and his wife, but only $437,500 was needed because the Mamoulideses provided $200,000 in seller financing. Banks loaned money to Intrepid without properly checking out the development’s potential, regulators later said. At Merchants Trust & Savings Bank, which allowed Intrepid to borrow about $860,000 in 1981 when Mamoulides was a board member, examiners said River Glen’s appraised value of $1.6 million was “highly questionable” and was “not regarded as sufficient to protect against possible loss.” Enterprise and Merchants lent people regulators called serious credit risks money to buy property directly from Mamoulides or from Intrepid. RTC court papers called Tom Lattie, head of Intrepid, his son Gary Lattie, and Warren Elliot of Magna Homes “clearly uncreditworthy.” NOTEWORTHY: Enterprise in effect bailed out Merchants’ bank at least once by lending $350,000 to Intrepid that it used to make payments on a loan in default at Merchants, where Mamoulides was a director and a major stockholder. Among those who bought lots in River Glen were Carl Eberts, a business associate of Mamoulides , who spent $70,650 on three lots; Mitchell Martin, the owner of A & W Marine and a campaign contributor, who spent $103,250 on two lots; and Xavier Grilletta, a campaign contributor who owns B & G Crane Service, Marerro, spent $160,425 on six lots. THE FALLOUT: The RTC sued Intrepid and Magna Homes over the bad loans and foreclosed on the property. It sold 28 vacant lots to a group of Covington investors. A Tennessee investor bought the outstanding Enterprise notes to Magna Homes and Intrepid and foreclosed on the remaining property, including the 75 undeveloped acres, buying them at a sheriff’s sale in January 1996. The final cost to taxpayers could not be determined from court records because a third party purchased some of the outstanding debt for an undisclosed amount. About 24 homes were built in River Glen. At least two more are under construction. ============================================================= ST. CHARLES LIVING CENTER A proposed $20 million retirement community and nursing home complex on St. Charles Avenue, one block from the Pontchartrain Hotel. PHOTO THE BOTTOM LINE: The failure of a rest home project spawned at least 11 lawsuits seeking almost $4 million in damages over unpaid bills and defaulted loans. Most of the money was never collected. HOW MAMOULIDES GOT INVOLVED: Mamoulides and several others formed a real estate partnership in 1981. They subsequently purchased the old OK Storage building at 1901 St. Charles Ave. in New Orleans and several surrounding houses. The partners’ first development idea, office condominiums, was nixed in 1985 when the office market started to turn sour. THE DEAL: The St. Charles Living Center was pitched as the first project of its kind in the New Orleans area, a 322-unit development that would offer several types of housing for senior citizens, ranging from self-sufficient apartments to traditional nursing home services. Over neighborhood objections, the New Orleans City Council approved the proposal in 1986. Several pre-Civil War houses were torn down to make way for the project in 1987, but that was the last site work to take place. WHAT WENT WRONG: Mamoulides and his partners never were able to obtain financing for the venture. At one point, in an effort to receive approval for an $8.24 million HUD loan, records suggest that three nursing homes put up for collateral already had been put up as collateral for another loan. That and subsequent efforts to obtain HUD financing fell through. One potential lender backed away after taking a look at the project in 1985, citing the partnership’s lack of cash, failure to produce a marketing plan and inflated profit projections. At least five vendors, including a local law firm and two architectural and engineering companies, sued over unpaid bills that totalled $450,000. Two of the vendors won judgments against the partnership totalling $143,000, while two others settled out of court. Also were sued by two lenders over unpaid loans totalling $2.4 million. Both lenders won judgments in the full amount of their claims. NOTEWORTHY: In 1990, longtime Mamoulides business associate Carl Eberts bailed the project out of one problem when he satisfied one of the two big judgments against The Avenue Partnership. Having done that, he then sued to collect from some of the partners. But Michael Berenson, an attorney for one of the partners, said in an interview that Eberts “selectively” collected from the group. There is no record in Orleans or Jefferson parishes that Eberts sued Mamoulides . THE FALLOUT: First National Bank of Jefferson won a $1.7 million judgment against Mamoulides and his partners, but was never paid by any of the partners. The bank foreclosed on the six-story OK Storage building in 1992. Though other proposals have since surfaced for the property – ranging from a welfare office to an Italian restaurant – the building remains vacant. ============================================================= TANHO HARBOR A 380-acre residential subdivision bordered by the Tangipahoa River. The property was split into 520 house lots, which typically sold for $3,000 apiece. PHOTO THE BOTTOM LINE: Sales agents used Mamoulides ‘ name to help sell lots in a failed residential development, and many of the buyers still blame the former district attorney for the loss of their money. HOW MAMOULIDES GOT INVOLVED: In the early 1970s, Mamoulides and several associates – including A.J. Graffagnino, Doug Allen and Clarence McManus – bought a controlling interest in a real estate company called RIC Inc. for about $400,000. RIC, formerly Roy Investment Corp., owned the Tanho property and had been selling lots in the largely undeveloped property for about three years. THE DEAL: RIC Inc. hired Delta Acquisition & Development Corp. in Metairie to market Tanho Harbor. Delta’s typical pitch to customers included a free dinner and a free boat ride in Tangipahoa Parish. Buyers were allowed to finance their lot purchases by putting 10 percent down and paying the balance over five years. In two years, Delta lined up 77 buyers, who paid $89,700 in down payment money for 133 lots. WHAT WENT WRONG: The sales agency said RIC Inc. would develop a marina, clubhouse, tennis courts, swimming pool and other amenities. None of it was ever built. Several roads also were never built and many lot owners still can’t reach their property. RIC Inc. didn’t have clear title on some of the lots, as several lot buyers discovered when they tried to obtain their title on their property. RIC Inc. failed to register the subdivision with the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, which in 1977 ordered the company to offer refunds to at least some of 77 families who bought lots in the development. By registering the project, RIC would have had to give lot owners a property report listing potential drawbacks of the development and other important financial information. Mamoulides and his associates closed RIC and liquidated its assets in 1976, but several of the investors – including Mamoulides – continued trying to develop the property through a new entity called Tanho Property Corp. NOTEWORTHY: In 1981, McManus – then an assistant district attorney who the following year was endorsed by Mamoulides in his unopposed bid for a state judgeship – bought 15.6 acres at Tanho from the defunct RIC corporation for $32,000. That is roughly twice the per-acre price RIC paid for the land. THE FALLOUT: Tanho Property Corp. fared even worse than its predecessor, RIC Inc. The company, which changed its name to Adams Corp I in 1990, was sued by the Louisiana Insurance Department in 1992 for defaulting on $1.7 million in loans owed to Colonial Lloyds, a failed insurance company owned by the family of then-Jefferson Parish judge Bruce Naccari. The department foreclosed on Tanho Harbor in 1993 and is now attempting to auction off the land for about $200,000. Lot buyers said it doesn’t appear much if any of the $1.7 million – which was borrowed against the property – was spent on Tanho Harbor. The failure to complete improvements has made it impossible for many lot owners – who continue to pay taxes on their property – to build homes. Just 15 houses and a handful of trailers occupy the site today. ============================================================= 3101 WEST NAPOLEON STREET A two-story office building that houses a state mental health clinic, the Jefferson Parish Human Services Authority and commercial offices. PHOTO THE BOTTOM LINE: Mamoulides , a company he controlled, and an associate defaulted on a $2 million loan, and taxpayers were saddled with a tab of at least $1.05 million in bad debt. HOW MAMOULIDES GOT INVOLVED: He and former Parish President Doug Allen, a frequent business partner, bought the building for $1 million in April 1977 under a partnership called Phoenix American. The partnership in 1980 sold the building to another Mamoulides associate, Carl Eberts, for $1.65 million, partly in promissory notes. Eberts sold it back to the Mamoulides -controlled Commercial Resources Consultants, Inc., in 1988. THE DEAL: Eberts used the building as collateral in 1983 to borrow $2 million from Enterprise Federal Savings & Loan in Marrero. Jefferson Parish Council Chairman Robert Evans, a Mamoulides ally, was also chairman of the bank. WHAT WENT WRONG: Eberts was supposed to use the loan money to pay off the promissory notes and other debts. Federal regulators could only account for $1.55 million of the $2 million loan. Regulators could not account for the other $445,000. Commercial Resources Consultants bought back the building from Eberts and assumed primary responsibility for paying off the loan. Then the company defaulted and the building was seized by U.S. marshals in 1993. Enterprise Federal went under in 1989 and was taken over by the Resolution Trust Corporation, which later documented a number of improper loans approved by Evans’ bank, including the one to Eberts. The Resolution Trust Corporation said the loan to Eberts was inappropriate because the building’s value was exaggerated so much that even if the building was 100 percent occupied, it would not have broken even. NOTEWORTHY: Beginning in 1991, The Jefferson Parish Council approved $500,000 to rent space in the building for five years to house the mental health clinic, and spent another $100,000 on renovations. Several council members later that year said they didn’t know the building was owned by Mamoulides , and passed a measure to require public officials to disclose their real estate dealings with the parish. THE FALLOUT: In March 1994, after a suit filed by the Resolution Trust Corp., a federal court issued a judgment of $2.6 million against Commercial Resources Consultants, Mamoulides and Eberts. Three months later, Clovis & Roche, a collections company renting space in the building, bought 3101 West Napoleon for $1.2 million as part of an undisclosed settlement with the RTC. No records could be found of the RTC pursuing Mamoulides and Eberts for the $1.4 million remaining on the $2.6 million judgment.”””

    6.5.02 TP, James Gill

    “””Lately it seems that whenever a suspected crook takes it on the lam from Louisiana, he leaves a politician friend behind.

    The most recent precipitous departure was that of Nofio Pecora, who has done prison time before and apparently did not relish repeating the experience when a federal grand jury indicted him on 40 counts of fraud a couple of months ago. When time came for a court appearance, there was no response at the cry of Pecora’s name.

    Pecora’s mother, Frances, defendant in the same indictment and no stranger to incarceration herself, remained to face the music.

    You might think in the circumstances that the Pecoras would be disinclined to take a shine to prosecutors, but there is one exemption. Frances’s long-time pal and business partner is none other than Jefferson Parish District Attorney John Mamoulides .

    The Pecoras’ latest alleged malefactions were committed when they were running Certified Lloyds, a small and chronically undercapitalized insurance company.

    Mamoulides seems to have something of an affinity for dubious insurers, having enjoyed a cozy relationship with the Southshore Holding Co., whose principals systematically stripped the assets of its subsidiaries, according to a report by state Inspector General Bill Lynch.

    One of those subsidiaries, Midwest Life, lent a Mamoulides company almost $3 million on a stalled real estate development in St. Tammany Parish and agreed to provide another $1.7 million so that he could qualify for a HUD loan guarantee to build a nursing home on St. Charles Avenue. That deal never went through, however.

    Mamoulides ‘ association with Southshore might prove a little awkward for incoming Attorney General Richard Ieyoub, who will inherit criminal and civil investigations of the company initiated under Billy Guste. As Calcasieu Parish district attorney, Ieyoub was buddies with Mamoulides and relied on his help during the attorney general’s race and the transition period.

    If Nofio Pecora’s whereabouts are unknown, the same applies to Stavros Amitsis, a Greek speculator indicted in absentia by a federal grand jury last year.

    Amitsis’s alleged offenses involved financial sleight of hand in cahoots with Enterprise Federal of Marrero, a subsequent casualty in the savings and loan scandal.

    Amitsis probably doesn’t send Christmas cards to American friends these days, but, if he did, prominent on his list would be Bob Evans. As chairman of Enterprise Federal, Evans ruled with an iron fist, according to a lawsuit filed by the Resolution Trust Corporation to retrieve some of the squandered loot from him.

    Evans, who happens to be one of Mamoulides ‘ leading sidekicks, is also chairman of the Jefferson Parish Council.

    It took the feds some time to locate Carlos Miro, but they finally did so last year. He sits in a Spanish jail awaiting extradition. Miro, they say, took policyholders’ money from his Anglo-American Insurance Company and wired it to bank accounts he controlled in foreign parts.

    In happier times, Miro rubbed shoulders with a better – or, at least, better dressed – class of person than you are likely to meet in stir.

    Our once and future governor, Edwin Edwards, picked up a retainer as attorney to Anglo-American the minute he left office in 1988. Even before stepping down, Edwards had close ties to Miro.

    When Edwards was governor last time, Miro agreed to buy a Texas ranch from him, using Anglo-American policyholders’ money, of course. Gus Mijalis, a known associate of Edwards, was also on Miro’s payroll at the time. Miro was set for a major role in a state-operated workers’ compensation fund in the last Edwards’ administration, but that scheme was scuttled by the Legislature.

    Have politicians, this holiday season, been drinking a toast to absent friends and wishing they would return? Don’t bank on it.

    James Gill is a staff writer.”””

    — 9.22.91 TP:

    “It seemed like a motherhood issue when the Jefferson Parish Council decided on June 19 of this year to rent 10,000 square feet of office space to house a mental health clinic.

    But when the council starts to appear enlightened is the time you most need to be on your guard.

    The council decided to rent space at 3101 West Napoleon Avenue for five years at a total cost of almost half a million dollars and authorized its chairman, Bob Evans, to sign the lease.

    He did so with uncharacteristic alacrity, consummating the deal 12 days later. Why Evans was so hot to trot is hard to say, but it might be relevant that the building is owned by Commercial Resources Consultants Inc. Records at the secretary of state’s office show that the president and sole officer of that company is none other than District Attorney John Mamoulides , Evans’ old buddy and the dominant political figure in the parish.

    According to the parish attorney’s office, the lease did not have to be put out to public bid and, of course, it was not.

    Having leased the space, the parish then discovered that it was not in suitable shape to house the mental health clinic after all. No problem. The council Sept. 4 appropriated another $100,000 for renovations.

    Once the parish lease was signed, Mamoulides arranged to use the building as part of the collateral for a $2.345 million loan.

    Mamoulides is 20 percent owner of The Avenue Partnership, which has applied for an $8.24 million loan guarantee from HUD to build a nursing home on St. Charles Avenue, according to HUD records obtained under the Freedom of Information Act.

    But to qualify for the federal loan guarantee, the Mamoulides partnership must demonstrate it has $1.85 million on hand to pay fees, insurance premiums, initial operating costs and other expenses.

    Raising that scratch has been a problem for The Avenue Partnership. Earlier this year a HUD agreement to guarantee the loan expired for failure to meet the up-front cash requirement.

    Now the partnership has filed a new application and has come up with a new plan to meet that requirement.

    Which is where 3101 West Napoleon, newly leased, enters the picture.

    Patrick Sharp, president of Miller, Patrick & Rowe of Harvey on July 1 – the same day the West Napoleon lease was signed – wrote to Robert Vasquez, HUD ‘s New Orleans manager. In his letter Sharp allowed as how his firm would lend The Avenue Partnership $2.345 million to close the federal loan guarantee for the nursing home. Collateral would be 3101 West Napoleon and the AAA Building on Causeway Boulevard, Sharp wrote.

    Mamoulides first acquired an interest in the AAA building in 1979, since when it has changed hands in a dizzying succession of transactions. At the moment public records show that Mamoulides holds an indirect interest in the building but is poised to reassume direct ownership any day now.

    The AAA building belongs to Certified Lloyds, an insurance company owned by Frances Pecora and New Orleans assessor Janyce Degan, according to records at the state Insurance Department.

    Certified Lloyds acquired the building in 1989 from a Mamoulides corporation called 3445 Causeway Associates Inc. In return, Pecora said at the time, Mamoulides received stock in her FSP Corporation, which is described in Insurance Department records as co-owner of Certified Lloyds. Thus Mamoulides became a shareholder in a company that owned the AAA building through a subsidiary.

    Now, the AAA building is to be transferred out of Certified Lloyds and back to 3445 Causeway Associates. On August 12, six weeks after Sharp told HUD he would accept the building to secure the loan to The Avenue Partnership, the Insurance Department approved the transfer of the building as part of an agreement whereby Certified Lloyds will be sold to a company that Insurance Department records show will infuse more than $3 million.

    In a report filed with the secretary of state June 28 of this year, Mamoulides is listed as vice president of 3445 Causeway Associates. Pecora, who has done time in prison for attempting to bribe the sheriff and the DA in Tangipahoa Parish, is listed as president.

    The sale of Certified Lloyds and the transfer of the building was approved in an August 12 letter to Pecora from acting Insurance Commissioner Hunter Wagner, who had just submitted his resignation. He left office 10 days after writing the letter to become general manager of the Causeway.

    Wagner is no stranger to the Mamoulides partnership’s effort to qualify for a HUD guaranteed loan. For the original application last year – the one that eventually fell through – he arranged a $1.85 million loan for the partnership to meet HUD ‘s cash requirement and received an $18,500 commission.

    The AAA building, undistinguished and asbestos-riddled though it is, exerts a great fascination over companies that do business with Jefferson Parish.

    Such major players as Camp, Dresser & McKee, Gulf Systems, Gulf Engineers and NY Associates are among the contractors who have chosen to rent space there.

    James Gill is a staff writer.”

    — 9.6.91 TP:

    “””When a partnership that includes Jefferson Parish District Attorney John Mamoulides and state District Judge Jacob Karno last year needed to show it had enough cash to qualify for an $8.24 million loan guarantee from the federal government, it arranged to borrow money on the strength of assets that public records suggest it had no authority to pledge.

    To meet the federal cash requirement, Mamoulides , on behalf of The Avenue Partnership, signed a $1.85 million loan commitment from an insurance company, according to records obtained by The Times-Picayune under the Freedom of Information Act.

    But the collateral specified in the loan commitment belongs to a different partnership, Living Center Enterprises, of which Karno is a one-third owner. The Living Center Enterprises partnership agreement shows that its assets cannot be pledged without the consent of Karno’s two partners, one of whom, Jefferson Parish Councilman T.J. “Butch” Ward, said he had no knowledge of the transaction.

    Public records, moreover, suggest that the collateral was already pledged to pay off other debts. The records indicate that the collateral could not be used to secure new obligations. Public records contain no document granting the Living Center partnership authority to use its assets to secure additional debt.

    The $1.85 million loan commitment letter, naming Living Center assets as collateral, was submitted to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, which agreed to insure the $8.24 million loan for The Avenue Partnership, the members of which include Mamoulides and Karno.

    The loan was to be made to The Avenue Partnership by an Atlanta mortgage banking firm and used to build a nursing home on St. Charles Avenue.

    Under the HUD loan guarantee, federal taxpayers would have reimbursed the bank making the loan in the event of a default by the borrower, The Avenue Partnership.

    The loan was never obtained and HUD ‘s agreement to guarantee it expired in March, records show.

    Mamoulides and Karno could not be reached for comment.

    *** Had to meet prerequisite ***

    The HUD loan guarantee was obtained under a federal program established in 1937 to assist in the construction of nursing homes. The program had guaranteed $3.2 billion in loans for nursing home construction through 1988, according to HUD .

    The Avenue Partnership applied for the $8.24 million federal loan guarantee in July 1989.

    The HUD documents show that a prerequisite for the loan guarantee was that the partnership prove it could produce $1.85 million up front to cover fees and other costs.

    To meet that requirement, the partnership submitted documents indicating that the up-front cash would be borrowed from the Midwest Life Insurance Co., which has since been put into liquidation by state authorities.

    An agreement between Midwest and The Avenue Partnership stated that “up to $1.85 million in cash as needed for the closing of the HUD nursing home project” would be made available and that collateral would be “personal signatures” and the pledge of commercial leases from three nursing homes, known as the Chateau, Meadowcrest and Iberville Living Centers. The first two are in Jefferson Parish and the third is in Plaquemine, La.

    The nursing homes belong not to The Avenue Partnership but to Living Center Enterprises. Living Center Enterprises built the three nursing homes with $12.9 million in proceeds from bonds issued by the Louisiana Public Facilities Authority in 1983.

    When the bonds were issued, Living Center Enterprises pledged all “gross revenues” to pay them off, mortgage records show. The term “gross revenues” is defined in the bond documents to include all money derived by Living Center Enterprises “from its operation and possession of, and in connection with” the nursing homes.

    The gross revenues from the homes are pledged through the year 2005 to pay off those debts, mortgage records show.

    The Living Center Enterprises partnership agreement, filed in the secretary of state’s office, stipulates that all three partners – Karno, Ward and the estate of the late District Judge Wallace Lebrun – must agree if assets are used to secure a loan.

    That did not happen in this case. “I have nothing whatsoever to do with St. Charles Avenue,” Ward said, “and did not know until now that the leases had been used as collateral by the DA’s partnership. It is legally impossible to mortgage any of the partnership’s assets – even if they weren’t already encumbered – without the consent of all the partners. I would not have agreed to it. I was not involved, period.”

    Lebrun’s daughter and the administrator of his estate, Judy Mackles, refused to comment. The Lebrun estate, in addition to its interest in Living Center Enterprises, is a 10 percent owner of The Avenue Partnership, HUD records show. The records show that each of the following holds 20 percent: Mamoulides , his longtime friend Carl Eberts, Ohio businessman David Skylar and a corporation owned by Ruth Fertel and James Queyrouze. Karno holds 10 percent, records show.

    *** Two requirements set ***

    The Avenue Partnership first applied for a HUD loan guarantee on July 24, 1989, to build a nursing home at the old O.K. Storage & Transfer Co. warehouse at 1901 St. Charles Ave. But the partnership revised its application three times before finally requesting on April 25, 1990, that HUD guarantee an $8.24 million loan from American Capital Resources Inc. of Atlanta.

    Federal authorities required The Avenue Partnership to do two things:

    Come up with $1,858,155 to pay professional fees, taxes, insurance premiums and other costs not covered by mortgage proceeds, HUD records show. This money, in HUD ‘s parlance, is called the cash requirement.

    Arrange with a commercial bank to loan the $8.24 million that would be used to build the nursing home. It was this loan that the federal government would guarantee. But before the partnership could get the guarantee, it had to secure the first loan.

    In an apparent effort to demonstrate its ability to obtain the $1.85 million, the partnership on March 7, 1990, forwarded to HUD a copy of a letter to Karno from A.F. LaPeyronnie, president of the Gulf South Bank in Jefferson Parish.

    In his letter, LaPeyronnie said he had evaluated the nursing home leases in response to a request from Karno. LaPeyronnie’s letter, dated March 6, 1990, said that the leases on the Chateau, Meadowcrest and Iberville Living Centers were worth $2.45 million and that a request for a loan of $2.1 million to be secured by them “would be considered” by his bank. The loan “could be used in the closing of your St. Charles Avenue project,” LaPeyronnie wrote.

    His letter made no reference to the 1983 pledge of nursing home revenues to LPFA, nor did it address the question of whether Karno had the authority to pledge them.

    LaPeyronnie refused to comment, but HUD records indicate that his bank did not make a loan.

    HUD rejected The Avenue Partnership’s application for a loan guarantee April 17, 1990, in part because of a failure to demonstrate that it could meet the cash requirement, HUD records show.

    *** Application reinstated ***

    But the application was reinstated in July 1990, after Mamoulides “delivered documentation” to prove the partnership could meet the cash requirement, according to a letter in HUD ‘s files from Leo Shey, American Capital Resource’s senior vice president.

    The Midwest commitment to make the $1.85 million loan, which was to be secured by personal signatures and the nursing home leases, was signed just a few days before – June 26 – by Mamoulides , Queyrouze and Midwest chairman Gary Jackson.

    The loan commitment was arranged by Hunter Wagner, who subsequently became state insurance commissioner, replacing Doug Green when he was convicted of fraud in federal court in March 1991.

    The Midwest Life Insurance Co., which paid a substantial part of Green’s defense costs, ran into financial difficulties and was put under the control of ad-hoc insurance commissioner, retired Supreme Court Judge John Dixon. Wagner recused himself from handling the Midwest case at the request of Attorney General William J. Guste Jr.

    Wagner said The Avenue Partnership paid him a 1 percent fee – $18,500 – for arranging the Midwest loan commitment.

    Joseph Brinkley, then HUD ‘s acting manager in New Orleans, approved the federal guarantee on the planned mortgage loan July 27, records show.

    Gary Alex, president of American Capital Resources, wrote to Mamoulides Sept. 18, 1990, agreeing to make the $8.24 million mortgage loan. But the deal was never consummated and the HUD guarantee, though extended at least five times past its initial 60-day expiration date, finally lapsed March 15, 1991.

    “They were on the verge of closing, but Midwest got into difficulties and could not come up with the cash,” HUD spokesman Mike Kastanek said.

    *** Partnership sued ***

    While The Avenue Partnership was applying for the HUD loan guarantee, it was sued in federal court for defaulting on a $600,000 promissory note secured by the property on which the St. Charles Avenue nursing home was planned.

    In judgments dated April 20, 1989, and Feb. 7, 1990, the partnership was ordered to pay $650,795 to a trust from which it had bought the O.K. Storage building in 1981. When the partnership failed to make the payments ordered by the court, Eberts agreed to take ownership of the promissory note and pay off the trust in installments, said Walter Antin, an attorney for the trust.

    The Avenue Partnership has submitted another application for a HUD loan guarantee to build the nursing homes, Kastanek said. Alex said American Capital Resources remains the mortgagee, but would not reveal how The Avenue Partnership proposes to meet the cash requirement.

    HUD officials have thus far refused to release documents concerning the reapplication for a loan guarantee.

    Records of The Avenue Partnership’s earlier application also were withheld from The Times-Picayune by Brinkley of HUD ‘s New Orleans office. Some of the records were released after the newspaper appealed to HUD ‘s general counsel in Washington, D.C.”””

    Reply
  2. telemachus

    Correction, the latest (first article above) is by Pamela Coyle And Jeffery Meitrodt, not Gill; the others are by Gill.

    Reply
  3. telemachus

    One more:

    — 05.12.96 TP

    “DEADBEAT D.A.”

    “By PAMELA COYLE AND JEFFREY MEITRODT”

    “””When John Mamoulides stunned his closest political advisers with his abrupt retirement last week after 24 years as district attorney, officials praised the veteran prosecutor.

    In a news conference in the grand jury room Wednesday, Mamoulides ‘ hand-picked successor, Jack Capella, said his boss’ election in 1972 “was the best thing that ever happened to Jefferson Parish as far as politics goes.”

    But there is another, lesser known side to John Mamoulides .

    This is the John Mamoulides who – on his own or through his numerous business interests – has defaulted on more than $18 million in loans and who has been sued either personally, as a business owner or as a partner more than two dozen times, according to a six-month investigation by The Times-Picayune.

    As a member of the board of Merchants Trust & Savings Bank, Mamoulides and several fellow directors rewarded themselves with large loans that violated federal banking regulations, according to examination reports filed with the Louisiana Office of Financial Institutions.

    As a developer, Mamoulides was behind two subdivisions in which lot buyers say they did not get what they were promised, including one development where the sewage system is so inadequate that property owners cannot build on their lots.

    As an investor, Mamoulides participated in deals with two associates of the late reputed mob boss Carlos Marcello.

    As chief prosecutor in Jefferson Parish, Mamoulides , 63, oversaw an office that dismissed two dozen traffic charges for his circle of associates or family members.

    Mamoulides has canceled or declined several requests to answer questions about his business practices. He called off an interview set for May 3, with his office saying he had to take his wife to the doctor. A second appointment was set for Wednesday.

    But at a hastily called news conference that morning, Mamoulides announced his resignation, effective Friday, and then canceled the interview. He did not respond to three subsequent requests for interviews.

    Over the past 23 years, Mamoulides has played a significant role in at least seven major real estate projects that struggled or were outright failures. His largest office building landed in bankruptcy. A $20 million nursing home project never got off the drawing board. A 520-lot development started two decades ago in rural Tangipahoa Parish remains more swampland than subdivision.

    Mamoulides ‘ financial transactions are a study in complexity. Properties repeatedly passed from him to his associates and back. Many times these transactions led to additional borrowing, other times they were non-cash transactions whose business purpose is unknown.

    While the oil bust bankrupted many developers and businessmen by depressing real estate prices, Mamoulides ‘ ventures often stayed afloat by borrowing from politically-connected banks and insurance companies without showing that they had the means to repay the loans, according to court records and bank examiner reports. In cases where these lenders failed, taxpayers paid millions to bail out depositors and policy holders.

    Mamoulides or companies he either controlled or was a major investor in defaulted on about $18 million in loans they took out for their real estate ventures, records show.

    Of two dozen cases that went to court, Mamoulides and his partners lost virtually every time, according to records reviewed by The Times-Picayune.

    Over the past decade, unpaid lenders and vendors won judgments totalling $16 million against Mamoulides or his business interests. While some of the debts ultimately were settled, the total amount repaid cannot be determined because many settlement agreements are not included in the court records.

    Many of those plaintiffs are still waiting to be paid.

    “We haven’t heard a word from John Mamoulides ,” said New Orleans lawyer Michael Wanek, whose firm had represented Mamoulides and his partners but sued in 1993 over an unpaid $50,000 legal bill.

    “We handled it (the case) as a courtesy because of the people involved,” said Wanek, adding that the firm relaxed its typical rule of asking for an up-front retainer or negotiating its fees in advance. “But when we ask to be paid, we expect payment.”

    So far, Wanek said, just two of Mamoulides ‘ partners have paid their share of the fees: Jefferson Parish Judge Jacob Karno, and the family of the late judge Wallace LeBrun.

    Growing

    ambitions

    Mamoulides , the son of a Crowley candy-maker who immigrated from Greece, started dabbling in real estate in the late 1950s with Tulane Law School classmate and future Jefferson Parish President Doug Allen.

    The duo’s first ventures were modest. They built a few houses and sold them for small gains. Soon, as young lawyers in booming Jefferson Parish, they had more success, selling properties within a year of buying them at healthy returns that sometimes topped 40 percent.

    In 1965, the two opened their own law practice. A year later, Mamoulides went to work as an assistant district attorney under Frank Landridge, Jefferson Parish’s top prosecutor since 1948, who quickly began grooming Mamoulides as his successor.

    Mamoulides remained with Allen until 1972, when Landridge, nearing the end of his fourth term in office, retired and anointed Mamoulides to serve out the remaining four months of his term.

    Soon, both Mamoulides ‘ political and business ambitions took a dramatic turn upward. After a bruising 1972 campaign against Jim Donelon, now a longtime Metairie state representative, Mamoulides was elected district attorney. The Democrat never again faced a serious challenger, winning three more six-year terms to a job that now pays $100,000 a year.

    Mamoulides wasn’t so fortunate in real estate. His subsequent business ventures never attained the luster that accompanied his emergence as one of the most powerful chieftains in Louisiana’s second most populous parish.

    Even some of his friends and associates say Mamoulides ‘ business skills are wanting.

    “He is a terrible businessman,” said Michael O’Brien, a behind-the-scenes force in Jefferson politics and a real estate investor with Mamoulides in a St. Tammany Parish subdivision venture.

    “In the business world, you make your money and you make it work and stay competitive. In the political world, you are elected and you are God and you pretty much can make things happen because of it,” O’Brien said.

    While Mamoulides was Jefferson Parish’s top prosecutor, he didn’t mind doing business with people who had trouble with the law.

    Over the past two decades, Mamoulides has put together deals with people who have been indicted or convicted on criminal charges ranging from bank fraud and money laundering to public bribery, sometimes before their business associations with Mamoulides , sometimes after.

    Included on that list are two-time convicted felon Frances Pecora, who once worked as personal secretary to Carlos Marcello. Her late husband, Nofio Pecora, was identified by federal officials as the No. 4 man in the Marcello crime family in the 1960s. Mamoulides also was a business partner with lawyer Anthony J. Graffagnino, who routinely handled legal work for the Marcellos in the 1960s, was a co-owner of a nightclub with Joseph Marcello, Carlos’ brother. Graffagnino later pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice and bank fraud charges.

    Others include:

    Former Jefferson Parish Council Chairman Robert Evans, a lawyer who doubled as chairman of Enterprise Federal Savings Bank of Marrero, which lent several million dollars to Mamoulides ‘ real estate ventures before failing in 1989. In a federal lawsuit against Evans, the Resolution Trust Corp. said the bank ignored standard lending practices in making the loans. Evans was indicted but acquitted on criminal charges relating to the failure of Enterprise, which cost taxpayers $38 million. His insurance company settled Evans’ civil case with the government by agreeing to pay $700,000.

    James H. Queyrouze, Mamoulides ‘ partner in an unsuccessful nursing home development. Queyrouze was indicted in 1983 for helping former Senate President Michael O’Keefe and four business associates fraudulently obtain $6 million in loans from Gulf South Bank, where Queyrouze was president and chairman, and two other banks. Queyrouze accepted a plea bargain that required him to complete a year of probation, after which formal charges against him were dismissed. Queyrouze was also president of Merchants Trust & Savings Bank, a Kenner bank that made $2 million in loans to Mamoulides and his business interests, some of them at a time when Mamoulides was on the bank’s board. Queyrouze died in 1993.

    Mamoulides ‘ relationship with Pecora goes back about 30 years, O’Brien said. About 1980, Tangipahoa District Attorney Duncan Kemp said in a recent interview, Mamoulides asked him to dismiss a speeding ticket against Pecora.

    “John called me up and said, ‘A friend of mine has gotten a ticket up there. Is there anything you can do?’ ” Kemp said. “And I declined. She was going too fast.”

    A few months later, in October 1980, Mamoulides called Tangipahoa Parish officials again on Pecora’s behalf, this time to see if Sheriff Ed Layrisson could help her son, known as Little Nofio, who had just been arrested for attempting to distribute 750 pounds of marijuana.

    “He spoke on behalf of Frances,” Layrisson said in a recent interview. “He said, ‘Frances is a friend of mine. If you can help her, I’d appreciate it.’ ”

    Within days, however, Pecora took things into her own hands. Two weeks after her son was busted, Pecora – through an intermediary – offered Kemp and Layrisson $100,000 if they’d drop or reduce the charges against Little Nofio. Pecora, who subsequently took over negotiations herself, was arrested shortly after delivering the second of two payments to Layrisson in a brown paper bag. Layrisson said Pecora told him the money came from Carlos Marcello.

    Pecora was convicted of public bribery and served one year of a two-year federal prison sentence.

    The conviction didn’t seem to impair her relationship with Mamoulides , who co-signed a $150,000 loan with Pecora in 1990. A year earlier, Mamoulides had become a part owner in Pecora’s F.S.P. Inc., a holding company that owned a controlling interest in Certified Lloyd’s Insurance Co.

    Pecora said at the time that Mamoulides received the shares as partial payment for the AAA Building that he owned, which Pecora counted as her ailing insurance company’s biggest asset to make it look more solvent than it was. But adding the building to Certified Lloyds’ books wasn’t enough and regulators shut it down in 1991.

    Pecora pleaded guilty to insurance fraud two years later and was sentenced to 30 months in prison. She was released in March after serving 26 months.

    Lake Pontchartrain Causeway General Manager Hunter Wagner, who describes himself as a longtime friend and political supporter of Mamoulides , said he’s never understood why Mamoulides took the risk of maintaining a relationship with Pecora.

    “It really didn’t make sense,” Wagner said. “But she’s got a certain mystique about her that gathers people around.”

    Through her attorney, Ronald Welcker, Pecora declined to be interviewed. Welcker also declined to comment on Pecora’s association with the Marcello family, except to say, “Many of her friends are people of Italian descent.”

    Unlike Pecora, Mamoulides ‘ business relationship with Graffagnino appears to have ended after their unsuccessful foray into the Tangipahoa Parish real estate market in the mid-1970s.

    Attempts to reach Graffagnino for comment were unsuccessful.

    On Oct. 18, 1989, two months before he sold the AAA Building to Pecora, Mamoulides ‘ office dismissed a DWI charge against her. Pecora, through her attorney, declined to comment.

    The dismissal was one of 25 traffic charges – ranging from expired brake tags to speeding to driving while intoxicated – filed against Mamoulides associates or their family members that were dismissed by his office in the past 10 years:

    In 1988, Mamoulides ‘ office dismissed a DWI charge against Carl J. Eberts Jr., son of the district attorney’s longtime business partner Carl J. Eberts. The younger Eberts pleaded guilty to reckless driving and received a 90-day suspended sentence. He also had to attend a driver’s education program and pay a $200 fine. Eberts declined to comment.

    The families of lawyers John Amato and Gordon Konrad each have had six traffic tickets dismissed by Mamoulides ‘ office. Charges included speeding, failure to obey traffic signs and driving with expired license plates. Konrad is a former assistant district attorney who went on to handle much of Jefferson Parish’s bond work. He also once guaranteed a $218,000 loan to Mamoulides . Amato contributed $10,000 to the Mamoulides campaign in 1984.

    Konrad and Amato bought the AAA building from a Mamoulides partnership, which financed part of the deal by issuing the two lawyers $1.2 million in promissory notes in 1980.

    Amato said, “I have never asked Mamoulides to dismiss a ticket.” He said buying the AAA building on credit from Mamoulides does not make him a business associate.

    Gordon Konrad said he doesn’t remember asking Mamoulides or any of his assistants to dismiss any tickets. In one case, he said he was part of a group that all got their tickets dismissed in court because a one-way sign they were ticketed for ignoring had just been put up.

    Records do not indicate that the district attorney personally intervened in these cases or that the Mamoulides ‘ associates asked him to step in.

    Investors burned

    Throughout the metro area, people ranging from a mechanic to a pharmacist to a metal worker still rue the day they bought a lot in Tanho Harbor, Mamoulides ‘ first major residential development.

    “It left a terrible taste in our mouths. Back then, we were relatively newly married. We had one child, and to see $2,000 go down the drain like that was really disheartening,” said Metairie resident Michele Alderman, who bought a $2,995 lot at Tanho with her husband, Thomas Alderman, in 1974. “We never saw any evidence that they spent our money on the improvements they were supposed to have.”

    Like many of the 77 families who bought a lot at Tanho Harbor, the Aldermans hoped to build an inexpensive weekend retreat at the development, located next to the Tangipahoa River east of Ponchatoula. The couple financed their purchase through Delta Acquisition & Development Co., which marketed the development for Mamoulides and his partners. The Aldermans’ payment schedule was typical: They had to make a 10 percent down payment, $295 in their case, and pay the balance over five years.

    They made their payments for two years, but eventually grew concerned over the lack of progress at Tanho Harbor and stopped. Not only had the developers failed to start work on the tennis courts and swimming pools buyers expected, but trees still stood where most of the roads were supposed to be built. That situation hasn’t changed 20 years later.

    Many of the lot buyers blame Mamoulides , whose name was routinely used by Delta to help sell the development, they say.

    “I figured this was going to be a good deal because all these very prominent people in Jefferson Parish were involved in it, and it turned out to be a shambles,” said lot buyer George Kipper, who shelled out about $1,000 in payments before he bailed out. “I wouldn’t vote for John Mamoulides again, I can tell you that. I haven’t voted for him since 1974. He couldn’t buy my vote.”

    Donald Simoneaux also remembers hearing sales pitches that explicitly mentioned Mamoulides ‘ involvement as proof that big things would happen.

    Simoneaux, who now lives in Diamondhead, Miss., and owns a car repair service, bought a lot and soon decided to start building. But he said he couldn’t get a title.

    He stopped paying and never again heard from the bank that financed the lot purchase. He still remembers how the sales agents “really glorified” the involvement of big-time players such as Mamoulides .

    Huey Pablovich, a Metairie insurance executive who then was a Delta sales agent, made some of those pitches. Even he had trouble, though. Pablovich said he won a lot in a sales contest, paid taxes on it for a few years and then received a letter saying he didn’t really own it.

    “We used these peoples’ names as credibility,” he said. “We had these reputable people backing it up who were going to follow through with what they said. I don’t know what happened.”

    Lot buyers are also mad because of Lake Ramsey, another residential project Mamoulides played a role in developing, but for a different reason. They’re sore because the former district attorney has failed to straighten out a mess that has brought building in the St. Tammany Parish subdivision to a standstill.

    The problem is the development’s sewer system, built by Intrepid Inc. at a time when state records indicate Mamoulides held an interest in the company.

    In December, St. Tammany Parish officials determined the system was inadequate to handle even the existing 38 homes in the 300-lot subdivision.

    Parish officials promptly slapped a building moratorium on the project until someone steps forward to upgrade the system. But that’s complicated. The system may be on a part of the development that was taken back by one of Mamoulides ‘ lenders, according to a civil suit. Mamoulides has said he still owns it but would be willing to sell out to a new developer. The whole matter has landed in court, where a judge will have to sort out the question.

    “I have a contractor on hold. I want to go back to school, and my career is on hold,” said Melinda Keller, who planned to move to Lake Ramsey with her husband and two children in June.

    Instead, the Kellers sold their St. Bernard Parish home and are renting a small apartment in Mandeville in the hope that the St. Tammany Parish Police Jury will soon lift the building ban.

    “I am ready to pitch a tent out there,” Keller said.

    Other lot owners are tired of waiting. “I am not going to pay for this lot forever if I won’t be able to do anything with it,” said Covington resident Mike Blanco, who bought a $24,000 lot in September and put it back on the market three months ago. “It is basically worthless if you can’t get a permit. We took a chance and now we are paying for it.”

    Longtime Lake Ramsey residents said newcomers shouldn’t pin their hopes on Mamoulides .

    “We’ve been trying to form a homeowners association for several years now, and we could never get Mamoulides to sit across the table from us,” said James Moll, who bought a home at Lake Ramsey nine years ago.

    Work as DA lauded

    Mamoulides ‘ supporters say his ill-fated business deals should not reflect on his legacy as one of the state’s leading prosecutors.

    O’Brien, who has two lawsuits pending against Mamoulides over the Lake Ramsey project but says he remains a close friend, said bad luck and timing also have played a role. He cited a commitment from the Department of Housing and Urban Development for an $11 million loan that would have salvaged the Lake Ramsey project that fell through because of political changes in Washington, D.C., just days before its scheduled closing.

    Mamoulides ‘ bad track record as a businessman and his ability to perform as district attorney are “100 percent not related,” O’Brien said. O’Brien and other Mamoulides supporters cite his office’s high rate of conviction, his advocacy for abused children and a slew of innovative crime-busting programs.

    “John’s ability to run a business is slim. As D.A., people are getting more than their money’s worth,” O’Brien said.

    Hard man to beat

    Some of Mamoulides ‘ lenders have not been able to get their money’s worth.

    The Louisiana Insurance Department won a $3.2 million judgment against Mamoulides in 1995, but has not moved aggressively to collect it, such as seizing his home or other assets.

    “We are investigating whether or not the judgment is collectible,” said attorney Emile Joseph, who represents the department.

    Former Assistant U.S. Attorney Ed Gonzalez, who now works for the state judge who oversees the department, said regulators aren’t doing anything to collect because “they think he’s broke.”

    The Insurance Department isn’t the only creditor that has not fully pursued Mamoulides .

    St. Tammany Parish businessman Richard Blossman won a $150,000 judgment against Mamoulides and Pecora in 1994. In 1979, Mamoulides bought $500,000 worth of land for the River Glen Estates subdivision outside Covington from Blossman , some of it on credit.

    Court records, however, show Blossman tried to seize only the bank accounts of Pecora, who in 1990 co-signed a note for Mamoulides ‘ outstanding debt. But Pecora’s own financial picture was shaky and to date she has repaid only $50,000 of $300,000 in restitution she was ordered to repay for her conviction on insurance fraud.

    Blossman said he hasn’t been paid a cent on the judgment but has no hard feelings because he was paid most of what Mamoulides originally owed him for the land.

    “Mr. Mamoulides has assured me that when it would be comfortable for him, he would pay that. And I presume that he will,” Blossman said.

    For some creditors, going after Mamoulides has been an uphill battle. Some believe he has benefited from his position and received gentler legal treatment than other civil defendants.

    Typically, people with judgments against them must appear in court and testify about bank accounts and other assets they have that could help settle the debt. But none of the court documents reviewed by The Times-Picayune show that Mamoulides has made such an appearance, despite millions of dollars in judgments for defaulted personal loans or business loans he guaranteed.

    The lawyer for one lender who tried to go the distance six years ago said the experience was grueling.

    First Guaranty Bank of Hammond hired lawyer Alton Lewis to collect on a $275,000 judgment it won against Mamoulides in a St. Tammany Parish court. But Lewis had to go to court on Mamoulides ‘ turf, Jefferson Parish, to get a judge to force payment. Judge Thomas Porteous, now on the federal bench, “did everything he could to help” the district attorney, Lewis said.

    “He ( Mamoulides ) would be in the courthouse and he wouldn’t show or he’d get continuances,” Lewis said. “I just kept coming back. I wasn’t going to go away.”

    Porteous said he had “no recollection of the continuances” and would not comment on the assertions that he gave Mamoulides preferential treatment. Campaign finance reports show Porteous gave Mamoulides a $10,000 campaign contribution in 1984, months before Porteous became a state district judge in the parish.

    Mamoulides eventually paid the judgment in May 1990, almost a year after Lewis started pursuing him, records show. Lewis said Mamoulides used proceeds from a $3 million loan Midwest Life Insurance Co. made to Lake Lots, a company Mamoulides formed to take over the struggling Lake Ramsey project.

    Would-be Lake Ramsey residents also believe Mamoulides ‘ position has saved him. Several lot buyers stalled by the moratorium said lawyers they’ve contacted to press Mamoulides to help settle the sewer snafu won’t touch the case, citing his power and prominence.

    Covington resident Brian Fornea, who hoped to be building his new home by now, said that if he built a substandard sewer system for his home some agency would “be knocking on my door, handing out daily fines.”

    Keller agreed, saying lawyers are afraid to fight Mamoulides .

    “It is unfortunate everyday people like us don’t have the prestige to hire an attorney and say, ‘Handle it,”‘ she said. “You can’t tell me his position has nothing to do with what is going on.” “””””””””

    =============================================================

    #ART:

    JOHN MAMOULIDES

    escaped the rigors of public life Friday when he quit as

    Jefferson Parish district attorney. For 24 years he was

    synonymous with prosecuting criminals. But his lesserknown

    legacy is a trail of failed private business ventures that

    ran up millions of dollars in unpaid loans. Some of the

    banks and insurance companies that loaned him money later

    failed, leaving taxpayers to help foot the bill.

    GRAPHIC

    _________________________

    Illustration:

    John Mamoulides [COLOR]

    STAFF PHOTO BY JOHN McCUSKER

    Melinda Keller and her sons Matthew, 17 and Brandon, 14 months, hoped to be living in a house built on their lot in Lake Ramsey, a subdivision in St. Tammany Parish that was supposed to be developed by a company owned by John Mamoulides . Instead, the development has run into financial trouble, officials say the sewage system for the subdivision is inadequate and the St. Tammany Parish Police Jury has banned new construction until the mess is sorteed out. “I have a contractor on hold,” Keller said. “I want to go back to school, may career is on hold. I’m ready to pitch a tent.”

    STAFF PHOTO BY DAVID GRUNFELD”””

    Reply
  4. telemachus

    Note the Porteous info by the way:

    “””The lawyer for one lender who tried to go the distance six years ago said the experience was grueling.

    First Guaranty Bank of Hammond hired lawyer Alton Lewis to collect on a $275,000 judgment it won against Mamoulides in a St. Tammany Parish court. But Lewis had to go to court on Mamoulides

    Reply
  5. whitmergate

    Tele, your comments are a must read for anyone to fully understand the deep rooted and pervasive degree of ingrained political corruption that has been smothering the political institutions of Jefferson Parish…life does imitate art…”The Godfather” indeed…

    Mamoulides was the Politico

    Reply
  6. imaangry

    Vitter, the staunch Republican, has received political contributions from the Big Mamou. Interesting how strange a bedfellows money and corruption make with party politics.

    Reply
  7. sop81_1

    This is dynamite stuff Telemachus. I’ve consistently been told the following equations were true.

    John Mamoulides=Carlos Marcello
    Moon Landrieu=Carlos Marcello

    Since we are using math, Jack Capella enters in this way:

    John Mamoulides=Jack Capella thus, Jack Capella=Carlos Marcello (no one in their right mind would think Mamo would annoint a non lackey to be his successor)

    Now Jack Capella works for John Georges, the man who ended up with many an old Carlos business enterprise including Lucky Coin if memory serves.

    What is interesting here is that Mamo and Georges are Greek, Marcello and Capella Italian. I mention this because the Greek community in the south is very close knit. I’ve always wondered about any other connections between Mamo and Georges besides Jack Capella. I imagine George Shin would be an interesting person to talk to on the subject of Jack Capella.

    Gate is 100% right on in his comments. Some of the Useless Attorneys in NOLA would include inept yes men (think Eddie Jordan here), corrupt sellouts (think Beetle Juice) and those that had their sights set far higher than local corruption (John Voltz). Throw in the would be Fred Heebe and I think that brings Gate’s comments into sharper focus why the key is corrupt US Senators nominating these miscreants to lifetime or vital federal positions.

    Don’t know how Daiper Dave plays in but Miss Piggy, Mary Landrieu, daughter to one of Carlos Marcello’s runners from back in the day fits nicely in this picture.

    One can only wonder how Mamo has thus far skated on Ongo and the shit house deals he has with RTA and JPS. I’m told he still has powerful friends in DC like David Barrett running interference for him. When you follow the money like James has done in Barrett/Mamo from DC down to NOLA the reasons blatant politician/crooks skate prosecution also comes into sharper focus.

    Quality comments here folks.

    sop

    Reply
  8. punditto

    An amigo friend tells me freakin Mamou had many attorneys peddling real estate for him with promises to each one that he would back them for a judgeship. freakin kinda like extortion. Correction to Gate’s comment ” this evil man was able to maturate the corruption in JP to new levels “. Gate sure you didn’t mean to use the word ” mastubate the corruption”- what else are those focker JP blackrobes good for. Definitely not justice. Question: is there a big enough focker funeral home for all his politico cronies to see him for his last real estate deal in the big asshole’s hole in the ground. suggest they cremate him cause there seems to be many people who may want to write on his headstone ” Here lies the infamous MF deadbeat CROOK and GODFATHER to GretnaMentality ‘.

    Reply
  9. telemachus

    I started looking at info about Jefferson Music Co. (still owned by Vincent Marcello) and it led to this…

    From an old post in the American Zombie:

    “Remember all the AP articles last fall about organized crime getting into Medicare fraud because the money is good and the sentences (if caught) are slim…
    1)Plug in “Progressive Home Health Care” to the state’s Secretary of State website. Address: 1732 Stumpf Blvd. Gretna. 2)Check the city assessor or state’s Secretary of State website under Vincent Marcello and see that 1732 Stumpf Blvd. Gretna is used as their main westbank location (including for MVP-Master Video Poker), at least contact address-wise. 3)Start looking into Milton “Mickey” Diaz and wonder how someone with an electrical engineering background from a community college can be running this kind of operation.

    http://www.theglobalwhoswho.com/profoftheyear_bio.asp?id=2122&industry=Home%20Healthcare

    http://theamericanzombie.blogspot.com/2010/07/love-is-in-air.html

    Check out Dambala’s response there. This is the guy that broke the whole Orleans IT scandal top to bottom.

    Ok, so then this from the LA SOS:

    “Business: PROGRESSIVE HOME HEALTH CARE, INC.
    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: MILTON O. DIAZ
    Title: Director, President
    Address 1: 1732 STUMPF BLVD.
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056

    Officer: RENEE A. DIAZ
    Title: Vice-President, Secretary, Director
    Address 1: 1732 STUMPF BLVD.
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056″

    “Business: MINACORE INVESTMENTS, L.L.C.
    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: VINCENT J. MARCELLO, JR.
    Title: Manager
    Address 1: 1025 BIENVILLE STREET, SUITE 5
    City, State, Zip: NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112
    Officer: ROMERO J. MARCELLO
    Title: Member
    Address 1: 1025 BIENVILLE STREET, SUITE 5
    City, State, Zip: NEW ORLEANS, LA 70112 ”

    *************

    Now this from the 4/1/00 TP, real estate transfers:

    “Armbruster subdivision, lots 1 through 6, square 1. ***************Lawrence E. Chehardy and George J. Peterson II to Minacore Investments LLC, $360,000.”

    [Oddly enough just under that, though probably unconnected, is: “Azalea Drive, lots 43, 44, 45 and 46, square 4. Albert James Ward Jr. to Willow Inc., $32,000.”]

    — 10.31.09 TP: “Minacore Investments LLC to Geocor Properties LLC, $175,000.”

    — 11.08.08 TP: “Clearview Estates, lots 18-22, square 14 and portion of lots 17, 27, 28 and 29, square 14. Minacore Investments LLC to Geocor Properties LLC, $1,450,000.”

    — 9.27.08 TP: “Jefferson Highway 10200-10. Minacore Investments LLC to Geocor Properties LLC, $600,000.” AND “Ames Blvd. 573. Minacore Investments LLC to Geocor Properties LLC, $225,000.”

    Geocor….. to the LA SOS:

    “Business: GEOCOR HOLDINGS, L.L.C.
    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: TIMOTHY A. PORTEOUS
    Address 1: 1525 AIRLINE DRIVE
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70001
    Appointment Date: 9/22/2008

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: JOHN D. GEORGES
    Title: Member
    Address 1: 1525 AIRLINE DRIVE
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70001

    Officer: GABRIEL CORCHIANI
    Title: Member
    Address 1: 1525 AIRLINE DRIVE
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70001 ”

    Chris Coulon’s CPC Consultants is practically (just one other) the only other company Tim Porteous shows up as a registered agent for, ever.

    That Georges was doing business with Miacore is not too surprising (except for the fact that money appears to be going TO Minacore, not from, just before the Orleans mayor’s race) but the fact that CHEHARDY sold a tract of land for 360K – received FROM Vincent Marcello – is pretty interesting I think.

    Reply
  10. telemachus

    Forgot to point out that the domicile address for Minacore and Progressive are exactly the same, hence the connection between the two:

    “Business: MINACORE INVESTMENTS, L.L.C.
    Charter Number: 34604568 K
    Registration Date: 12/31/1997
    Domicile Address
    1732 STUMPF BLVD.
    GRETNA, LA 70056″

    Reply
  11. telemachus

    As an aside, I’ve always wondered about Vinnie Mosca (see above), the guy has been mayor of harahan and everything else and these connections so rarely get mentioned?

    Ok, so Jefferson Music Co. …

    LA SOS shows:

    “Business: JEFFERSON MUSIC CO., INC.
    Mailing Address
    C/O VINCENT MARCELLO, JR.
    1215 FRIED STREET
    GRETNA, LA 70053
    Officer: VINCENT MARCELLO, JR
    Title: President
    Address 1: 1215 FRIED STREET
    City, State, Zip: GRETNA, LA 70053

    Mergers (2):

    Filed Date Effective Date: Type Charter# Charter Name Role
    12/31/1997 12/31/1997 MERGE 25305650D JEFFERSON MUSIC CO., INC. SURVIVOR
    34339621D REGAL VENDING, INC. NON-SURVIVOR
    9/5/2000 9/5/2000 MERGE 34401390D MASTER VIDEO POKER, INC. SURVIVOR
    25305650D JEFFERSON MUSIC CO., INC. NON-SURVIVOR ”

    If you follow the bouncing ball above you will see, all at the 1732 Stumpf address:

    – Master Video Poker / MVP Poker (formerly Jefferson Music)

    – Progressive Home Health

    – Minacore; and

    – Vincent Marcello Jr.
    http://www.nola.gov/en/City-Information/~/…/July13-915AM-115PM.ashx

    Reply
  12. telemachus

    Also at 1732 Stumpf?

    Formerly something called:

    “Type(s) Registered: TRADE NAME
    Registered Name: PORCELANOSA U.S.A.
    Applicant: TRANSNATIONAL COMPANIES, LTD.
    1732 STUMPF BLVD.
    GRETNA, LA 70053
    Type Of Business: TILE IMPORTED FORM SPAIN”

    http://books.google.com/books?id=5WAEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA41&lpg=PA41&dq=%221732+stumpf+%22+-progressive+-master+-mvp&source=bl&ots=FzcNO3mwwh&sig=8PVdSpFrmV0duL2qJg9-sTizxcQ&hl=en&ei=fjCFTY_ODIy4twfsg_TTBA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CCYQ6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=%221732%20stumpf%20%22%20-progressive%20-master%20-mvp&f=false

    Transnational:

    “TRANSNATIONAL COMPANIES, LTD. Business Corporation GRETNA Inactive

    Business: TRANSNATIONAL COMPANIES, LTD.
    Charter Number: 34112518 D
    Registration Date: 5/2/1983
    Domicile Address
    433 GLENMEADE CT.
    GRETNA, LA 70056

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: CLAVE GILL
    Address 1: 833 BARONNE STREET
    City, State, Zip: NEW ORLEANS, LA 70113
    Appointment Date: 5/15/1987

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: LUIS GUERRA
    Title: President
    Address 1: 10201 COWAN HEIGHTS
    City, State, Zip: SANTA ANA, CA 92805″

    Let’s guess here – Clave Gill is probably related to Carlos Marcello’s longtime attorney G. Wray Gill, maybe his son. There is also a Clave Gill III.

    Reply
  13. Ashton O'Dwyer

    To “telemachus”: Clave Gill II is my good friend from Jesuit High School (Class of 1965) and a “straight arrow”. He is a corporate lawyer and in no way related to George Wray Gill or any of the “A E I O U” clan (SPIT!). Ashton O’Dwyer (with Celtic and Northern European Heritage, and NO “A E I O U” – SPIT!).

    Reply
  14. telemachus

    Think back to Drew Broach’s seemingly superficial column comparing River Birch to the Robco scandal. Maybe he was dropping more hints than people realized, or maybe it’s just that if millions are being stolen the same krewe will be behind it.

    There are thre big deals that signify the JP/Mamoulides/Marcello connections:

    – The sale /purchase of the LaSalle Tract;

    – The Robco canal bottoms purchase;

    – The legalization of casino and video gambling.

    —– Robco – 12.18.04 TP:

    “Since Gordon Konrad, owner of Robco Inc., objects strongly to the term “canal bottoms,” one thing has to be said from the git-go: Canal bottoms, canal bottoms, canal bottoms.

    Konrad thinks the time insufficiently dignified. It is, in fact, shorthand for a network of canals, their banks and adjacent strips of land in East Jefferson, which property tax rolls indicated were practically worthless until the state up and agreed to buy them all from Robco in 1986 and hand them over to the parish. The price: a cool $8 million. … The deal made sense politically, however, Konrad being an old friend of Parish Council President Bob Evans, who rammed through the resolution that made it all come to pass. Both Evans and Konrad were former assistants to, and remained cronies of, DA John Mamoulides , local political boss and long-time pal of Gov. Edwards.

    Konrad is now sole owner of Robco, but at the time, ******half the company belonged to J. Folse Roy, *********a land speculator best known up to that time as a business partner of Carlos Marcello, the late mob boss who was always sure of a cordial welcome from the Jefferson Parish political establishment.”

    —- The LaSalle Tract, 3.8.9 TP:

    “Still, Kefauver would not recognize the parish, where Lee suggests that, if casinos are legalized this year, a planned AAA baseball park and sports complex would be an ideal place to build one.”

    “It is an inspired choice of site for other reasons, too. If Jefferson gets its baseball team, and the Legislature approves casino gambling, it is almost certain that more space will be needed to accommodate these varied delights on Airline Highway.

    As luck would have it, the parish could buy a 30-acre tract adjoining the baseball park, doubtless for a tidy sum.

    The owner, ******Gordon Konrad, happens to be a friend and business partner of Lee’s mentor, District Attorney John Mamoulides .

    But, of course, it is the general weal, all those dollars that would pour into the parish coffers, that prompted Lee to espouse one or more casinos in ********a letter to Parish Council chairman Bob Evans.

    Thoughtful though this is of the sheriff, some must have thought his intervention odd. It is not every day that a sheriff pops up to tout gambling.

    But Lee has taken it upon himself to lead the charge, and threatens to appear at the next council meeting and urge everyone to get cracking on feasibility studies.

    In his letter to Evans, Lee suggests that casinos could come to Jefferson Parish only if plans to install one at the Rivergate in New Orleans should fall through. But it ain’t necessarily so.

    There is a move afoot to amend the constitution and limit New Orleans, if casinos are legalized, to one.

    The idea behind the proposed amendment is to defuse some of the opposition to legalized gambling in the city, but it may also open the door for suburban parishes to cash in with casinos of their own.

    Certain suburban legislators are displaying a keener than usual interest in the affairs of the city and have developed a great enthusiasm for the constitutional amendment.

    With just one casino in the city, there ought to be plenty of moolah left for Jefferson, and maybe St. Bernard, to siphon off.

    Lee’s friend and fellow gambling enthusiast, Gov. Edwards, has said it might well happen.

    Jefferson Parish, having proved so adept at running illegal casinos, should have no difficulty with the legal variety.

    Certainly, there will be plenty of objections to the idea in Jefferson, but none can be expected from law enforcement authorities. *************Some things never change.******” – By James Gill, echoing Gate above.

    In both these stories you have a Mamo proxy, Konrad, then Konrad and Evans, pushing through initiatives and purchases that end up potentially profiting Marcello (one time via Roy as proxy, the other more directly through video gambling).

    Reply
  15. imaangry

    Veolia, you mean the same corporate conglomerate that runs RTA and Jeff Transit through contracts and that the Connick law firm has made millions off of? The names change, but the corruption remains. Good post, Whit.

    Reply
  16. whitmergate

    Think about it…

    http://www.kenrahn.com/Marsh/HSCA/CALLS.TXT

    194
    (817) Nofio Pecora.–Telephone records indicated that at 9:13 p.m. on October
    30, 1963, Jack Ruby placed all-minute call to the Tropical Court Tourist Park, a
    trailer park in New Orleans, La. The number called by Ruby, CH2-5431, was listed
    as the business office of the Tropical Court. In a partial compilation of
    various long distance telephone numbers called by Ruby which had been
    transmitted to the Warren Commission by the FBI in early 1964, a notation
    indicated that the Ruby call to the Tropical Court went to N.J. Pecora. (855)
    The Commission, however, did not interview or investigate Pecora and made no
    reference to him in its report.

    (818) Nofio J. Pecora, alias Joseph O. Pecoraro, was the owner of the Tropical
    Court Tourist Park. He ran the business from a oneman office located on the
    premises. (856) It had been this office that Ruby called on October 30. Pecora,
    a former heroin smuggler,(857) was an associate of Carlos Marcello,(858) the New
    Orleans Mafia leader. The FBI, Justice Department, and Metropolitan Crime
    Commission of New Orleans identified Pecora as one of Carlos Marcello’s
    associates,(859) with various members of the Pecora family being in contact with
    Marcello’s family.(860) The committee’s computer telephone project noted, for
    example, that Marcello placed a call to Nofio Pecora on June 24, 1963, at the
    same trailer office number that Ruby had called 4 months later.

    (819) Earlier in 1978, when the committee investigators questioned Pecora about
    the October 30, 1963, telephone can, he declined to respond. In September 1978,
    however, he finally agreed to answer questions by the committee. He stated that
    he did not recall receiving any telephone call from Jack Ruby and did not in
    fact know Ruby or have any knowledge of him.(861) Pecora believed that he was
    probably the only person who had access to his Tropical Court telephone in 1963,
    but that he might well have taken
    a telephone message for someone else who lived at the trailer park.(862) He
    suggested his interview that Ruby might have called his office on October 30 in
    an attempt to locate some other party,(863) but stated he did not believe he
    ever took a message from Ruby.

    (820) The evidence indicates that Ruby did in fact have an associate who lived
    at the Tropical Court Tourist Park at that time-Harold Tannenbaum, a New Orleans
    nightclub manager. He had run several Bourbon Street clubs affiliated with
    Marcclio interests. In his committee interview, Pecora admitted that he was
    acquainted with Tannenbaum and that they were neighbors in the trailer court.
    (864) He was not aware that Tannenbaum was a friend of Ruby.(865)

    (821) Harold Tannenbaum had met Ruby in the summer of 1963 and had discussed going into
    business with him. The computer telephone project established that Ruby and
    Tannenbaum were in regular contact by telephone from June until October 1963.
    The committee also found that 1 hour after the l-minute call from Ruby’s office
    to Pecora’s office, Tannenbaum himself placed a call to Ruby. This sequence
    could thus be interpreted as consistent with what Pecora suggested- that Ruby
    called his trailer court office simply to relay a message to another party.
    Nevertheless, Pecora did not recall relaying any long-distance telephone message
    from Ruby to Tannenbaum or anyone else in the trailer park. (866)

    Reply
  17. telemachus

    Gate, I have a great deal of interest in the JFK assassination, but I don’t buy into the Marcello theories.

    I will point this out from the above though: “Harold Tannenbaum, a New Orleans nightclub manager. He had run several Bourbon Street clubs affiliated with Marcclio interests.” Vincent Marcello, at least, has the following companies with specific Quarter addresses, who knows what others that Marsh, Minacore and the Marcello brood’s other companies may still also hold:

    Reply
  18. telemachus

    As posted elsewhere here today, today Chris Roberts received THE ENDORSEMENT OF THE MOB ITSELF in his run for Council at large:

    This is the endorsement on Roberts’ FB [provided the same day as the TP’s by the way]:

    “Progressive Home Health Care and Progressive DME supports Chris Roberts!!!! VOTE TODAY! EVERY VOTE COUNTS!!!!!!!!!!”

    [Punctuation and caps original].

    This was posted by someone named “Renee Templet Aposto”.

    Progressive Home Health Care is above.

    Here is Progressive DME:

    “PROGRESSIVE DME & MEDICAL SUPPLY, INC. Business Corporation TERRYTOWN Inactive

    Business: PROGRESSIVE DME & MEDICAL SUPPLY, INC.
    Charter Number: 35736304 D
    Registration Date: 7/6/2004
    Domicile Address
    1141 WHITNEY AVE BUILDING 4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Mailing Address
    C/O MILTON O. DIAZ
    1141 WHITNEY AVE BUILDING 4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Status
    Status: Inactive
    Inactive Reason: Action by Secretary of State
    File Date: 7/6/2004
    Last Report Filed: 6/25/2007
    Type: Business Corporation

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: MILTON O. DIAZ
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVE BUILDING 4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Appointment Date: 7/6/2004

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: MILTON O. DIAZ
    Title: President, Director
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVE BUILDING 4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056

    Officer: RENEE A. DIAZ
    Title: Secretary, Director, Vice-President
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVE BUILDING 4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056

    Amendments on File (1)

    Description Date
    Revoked 11/19/2010 ”

    Let’s guess, Renee A. Diaz is Renee Aposto or Renee Templet Aposto???

    Here’s what turns up under that:

    *********DYNASTY HOME HEALTH, INC. Business Corporation NEW ORLEANS Inactive

    Business: DYNASTY HOME HEALTH, INC.
    Charter Number: 34558911 D
    Registration Date: 5/1/1997
    Domicile Address
    8316 SYCAMORE PLACE
    NEW ORLEANS, LA 70118
    Mailing Address
    C/O RENEE APOSTOL DIAZ, RN
    1141 WHITNEY AVE., BLDG. #4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Status
    Status: Inactive
    Inactive Reason: Action by Secretary of State
    File Date: 5/1/1997
    Last Report Filed: 2/8/2008
    Type: Business Corporation

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: RENEE APOSTOL DIAZ, RN
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVE., BLDG. #4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Appointment Date: 2/8/2008

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: RENEE A. DIAZ
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 3712 LAKE WINNIPEG DR.
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058

    Officer: MILTON O. DIAZ, JR.
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 3712 LAKE WINNIPEG DR.
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058

    *****************

    PROGRESSIVE ANTI-AGING SOLUTIONS, INC Business Corporation TERRYTOWN Inactive
    Business: PROGRESSIVE ANTI-AGING SOLUTIONS, INC
    Charter Number: 36323023 D
    Registration Date: 12/1/2006
    Domicile Address
    1141 WHITNEY AVE.
    BLDG #4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Mailing Address
    1141 WHITNEY AVE.
    BLDG #4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Status
    Status: Inactive
    Inactive Reason: Action by Secretary of State
    File Date: 12/1/2006
    Last Report Filed: N/A
    Type: Business Corporation

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: MILTON O. DIAZ JR.
    Address 1: 3712 LAKE WINNIPEG PL.
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058
    Appointment Date: 12/1/2006

    Agent: RENEE APOSTAL DIAZ
    Address 1: 3712 LAKE WINNIPEG PL.
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058
    Appointment Date: 12/1/2006

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: MITLON O. DIAZ JR.
    Title: Vice-President
    Address 1: 3712 LAKE WINNIPEG PL.
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058

    Officer: RENEE APOSTAL DIAZ
    Title: Vice-President
    Address 1: 3712 LAKE WINNIPEG PL.
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058

    *********************

    PROGRESSIVE ANGELS OF MERCY HOSPICE, INC. Business Corporation TERRYTOWN Inactive
    Previous Names
    ANGELS OF MERCY HOSPICE, INC. (Changed: 12/28/2006)

    Business: PROGRESSIVE ANGELS OF MERCY HOSPICE, INC.
    Charter Number: 36044672 D
    Registration Date: 11/4/2005
    Domicile Address
    1141 WHITNEY AVE. BLDG. #4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Mailing Address
    C/O RENEE A DIAZ
    1141 WHITNEY AVE. BLDG. #4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Status
    Status: Inactive
    Inactive Reason: Action by Secretary of State
    File Date: 11/4/2005
    Last Report Filed: 10/2/2007
    Type: Business Corporation

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: RENEE A. DIAZ
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVE. BLDG. #4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Appointment Date: 11/4/2005

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: RENEE A. DIAZ
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVE. BLDG. #4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056

    ******************

    MYLES MEDICAL MANAGEMENT, INC. Business Corporation TERRYTOWN Inactive
    Business: MYLES MEDICAL MANAGEMENT, INC.
    Charter Number: 35765827 D
    Registration Date: 8/23/2004
    Domicile Address
    1141 WHITNEY AVENUE
    BUILDING 4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Mailing Address
    C/O MILTON O. DIAZ
    1141 WHITNEY AVE., BLDG 4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Status
    Status: Inactive
    Inactive Reason: Action by Secretary of State
    File Date: 8/23/2004
    Last Report Filed: 8/7/2007
    Type: Business Corporation

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: MILTON O. DIAZ
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVENUE
    Address 2: BUILDING 4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Appointment Date: 8/23/2004

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: MILTON O. DIAZ
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVENUE
    Address 2: BUILDING 4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056

    Officer: RENEE A. DIAZ
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVENUE
    Address 2: BUILDING 4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056

    ********************

    DYNASTY HOME HEALTH, INC. Business Corporation NEW ORLEANS Inactive
    Business: DYNASTY HOME HEALTH, INC.
    Charter Number: 34558911 D
    Registration Date: 5/1/1997
    Domicile Address
    8316 SYCAMORE PLACE
    NEW ORLEANS, LA 70118
    Mailing Address
    C/O RENEE APOSTOL DIAZ, RN
    1141 WHITNEY AVE., BLDG. #4
    TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Status
    Status: Inactive
    Inactive Reason: Action by Secretary of State
    File Date: 5/1/1997
    Last Report Filed: 2/8/2008
    Type: Business Corporation
    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: RENEE APOSTOL DIAZ, RN
    Address 1: 1141 WHITNEY AVE., BLDG. #4
    City, State, Zip: TERRYTOWN, LA 70056
    Appointment Date: 2/8/2008

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: RENEE A. DIAZ
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 3712 LAKE WINNIPEG DR.
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058

    Officer: MILTON O. DIAZ, JR.
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 3712 LAKE WINNIPEG DR.
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058

    ********************************

    Note: Aposto also gets lised as “Apostol” and as “Apostal.”

    I will have more on this when I can.

    Reply
  19. telemachus

    That “Lake Winnipeg” address – which is in TIMBERLANE / Stonebridge (a Ward & Co. real estate development of course) – turns up in some odd places. Ferinstance:

    From a nola commenter:

    “Arent Nancy Cassagne and the current Parish Attorney Tom Wilkinson related?

    Anyone know why the dynamic duo would have created this company below?

    CWC GAMING, LLC Limited Liability Company HARVEY Active
    Business: CWC GAMING, LLC
    Charter Number: 37040115 K
    Registration Date: 5/6/2009
    Domicile Address
    3809 LAKE WINNIPEG DRIVE
    HARVEY, LA 70058
    Mailing Address
    3809 LAKE WINNIPEG DRIVE
    HARVEY, LA 70058
    Status
    Status: Active
    Annual Report Status: In Good Standing
    File Date: 5/6/2009
    Last Report Filed: N/A
    Type: Limited Liability Company

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: TOM WILKINSON
    Address 1: 320 HUEY P. LONG AVE
    City, State, Zip: GRETNA, LA 70053
    Appointment Date: 5/6/2009

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: TIMOTHY P. COULON
    Title: Member
    Address 1: 2116 HYDE PARK DRIVE
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058

    Officer: TIMOTHY WHITMER
    Title: Member
    Address 1: 3908 LAKE WINNIPEG DRIVE
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058″

    http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2009/11/post_111/5520/comments-2.html

    **********************************

    **** 0300007902 MARCELLO,JOHN L 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG DR LOT 17B SQ F TIMBER RIDGE *TWNHSE 10428902 3850 ************

    0300007983 LAC BIENVILLE LLC 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG LOT 6 SQ C TIMBER RIDGE 16000
    0300007984 LAC BIENVILLE LLC 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG LOT 7 SQ C TIMBER RIDGE 16000
    0300007985 LAC BIENVILLE LLC 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG LOT 8 SQ C TIMBER RIDGE 16000
    0300007718 LAC OSCAR LLC 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG TIMBER RIDGE 11001772 16300
    0300007677 LAC BIENVILLE LLC 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG LOT 1 SQ B TIMBER RIDGE 15000
    0300007678 LAC BIENVILLE LLC 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG LOT 2 SQ B TIMBER RIDGE 15000
    0300007679 LAC BIENVILLE LLC 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG LOT 3 SQ B TIMBER RIDGE 16000
    0300007693 LAC OSCAR LLC 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG LOT 17 SQ B TIMBER RIDGE 16270
    0300007696 LAC OSCAR LLC 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG LOT 20 SQ B TIMBER RIDGE 16150

    – That’s from the JP Assessor.

    It’s ironically because:

    “LAC BIENVILLE APARTMENTS Partnership METAIRIE Active

    Business: LAC BIENVILLE APARTMENTS
    Charter Number: 34158337 J
    Registration Date: 10/26/1984
    Domicile Address
    2626 N. ARNOULT ROAD
    METAIRIE, LA 70002
    Mailing Address
    2626 N. ARNOULT ROAD
    METAIRIE, LA 70002
    Status
    Status: Active
    Registered: 10/26/1984
    Last Report Filed: N/A
    Type: Partnership

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: LEONARD J. BORDELON
    Title: Partner
    Address 1: 2626 N. ARNOULT
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70002

    Officer: WILSON A. LAGRAIZE, JR.
    Title: Partner
    Address 1: 2626 N. ARNOULT
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70002

    Officer: LAWRENCE E. CHEHARDY
    Title: Partner
    Address 1: 2626 N. ARNOULT
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70002 ”

    “LAC BIENVILLE, LLC Limited Liability Company HARVEY Active
    Business: LAC BIENVILLE, LLC
    Charter Number: 36707262 K
    Registration Date: 3/28/2008
    Domicile Address
    4100 LAC COUTURE DR
    APT. D
    HARVEY, LA 70058
    Mailing Address
    C/O JOHN L. MARCELLO
    3625 LAKE WINNIPEG
    HARVEY, LA 70058
    Status
    Status: Active
    Annual Report Status: In Good Standing
    File Date: 3/28/2008
    Last Report Filed: 3/13/2011
    Type: Limited Liability Company

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: JOHN L. MARCELLO
    Address 1: 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058
    Appointment Date: 3/28/2008

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: JOHN L. MARCELLO
    Title: Member
    Address 1: 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058 ”

    Just to round out the notes:

    “Type(s) Registered: TRADE NAME, SERVICE MARK
    Registered Name: LAC BIENVILLE
    Applicant: LAKE MANAGEMENT OF JEFFERSON, INC.
    4971 W. NAPOLEON, PO BOX 73709
    METAIRIE, LA 70033
    Type Of Business: APARTMENT RENTAL
    Book #: 44-2058
    Current Status: INACTIVE
    Inactive Reason: EXPIRED

    Dates
    Registration Date: 10/24/1986
    Expiration Date: 10/24/1996
    Date First Used: 5/1/1985
    Date First Used (in La.): 5/1/1985 ”

    “LAC BIENVILLE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC. Non-Profit Corporation HARVEY Inactive

    Business: LAC BIENVILLE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.
    Charter Number: 34167083 N
    Registration Date: 2/12/1985
    Domicile Address
    4140 “B” LAC BIENVILLE DRIVE
    HARVEY, LA 70058
    Mailing Address
    4140 “B” LAC BIENVILLE DRIVE
    HARVEY, LA 70058
    Status
    Status: Inactive
    Inactive Reason: Action by Secretary of State
    File Date: 2/12/1985
    Last Report Filed: N/A
    Type: Non-Profit Corporation

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: FRAN NORMAND DALY
    Address 1: 1400 RICHLAND
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70001
    Appointment Date: 2/12/1985

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: ETHEL BOUDIN NORMAND
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 3701 N CAUSEWAY BLVD
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70002

    Officer: FRAN NORMAND DALY
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 1400 RICHLAND
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70001

    Officer: JEANNE NORMAND
    Title: Director
    Address 1: 3524 N. LABARRE RD.
    City, State, Zip: METAIRIE, LA 70002 ”

    “LAC OSCAR, L.L.C. Limited Liability Company HARVEY Active
    Business: LAC OSCAR, L.L.C.
    Charter Number: 40052445 K
    Registration Date: 11/13/2009
    Domicile Address
    4100 LAC COUTURE
    APT. D
    HARVEY, LA 70058
    Mailing Address
    C/O JOHN L. MARCELLO
    3625 LAKE WINNIPEG DR
    HARVEY, LA 70058
    Status
    Status: Active
    Annual Report Status: In Good Standing
    File Date: 11/13/2009
    Last Report Filed: 1/19/2011
    Type: Limited Liability Company

    Registered Agent(s)
    Agent: JOHN L. MARCELLO
    Address 1: 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG DR
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058
    Appointment Date: 11/13/2009

    Officer(s) Additional Officers: No
    Officer: JOHN L. MARCELLO
    Title: Member
    Address 1: 3625 LAKE WINNIPEG DR
    City, State, Zip: HARVEY, LA 70058 ”

    ***********************

    Also this:

    Donation, Aaron Broussard campaign, four amounts: Ray Johnson, VP, Chief Information Officer, Entergy Services, Inc., 3612 Lake Winnipeg Drive, Harvey LA 70058

    http://herndon1.sdrdc.com/pdf/757/27931111757/27931111757.pdf

    http://herndon1.sdrdc.com/pdf/559/27990159559/27990159559.pdf

    http://images.nictusa.com/pdf/539/27931581539/27931581539.pdf

    http://images.nictusa.com/pdf/984/27930825984/27930825984.pdf

    **********************************

    And this:

    11/9/03 TP, “Setting Up Shop”:

    “CT Investments, LLC, 3809 Lake Winnipeg Drive, Harvey, 70058-5174, Timothy A. Whitmer, Charles M. Whitmer.”

    *************************************

    4.14.07 TP real estate transfers:

    “Lake Winnipeg Drive 3804. Willow Inc. to Crystal A. Jourdain, $370,000.”

    *****************************

    Note that 3809 Lake Winnipeg also gets shown as 3908 Lake Winnipeg, above.

    ***************************

    Note the names so far:

    Marcello

    Normand

    Chehardy

    Reply
  20. telemachus

    12.17.05 TP, Nell Nolan:

    “At Andrea’s, Progressive Home Health Care Inc. amassed a number of public officials, local physicians and members of the medical community to discuss the future of health care in the metropolitan area. Company owners Mickey and Renee Diaz welcomed Patrick and state Sen. Julie Quinn, Kenner Mayor Phil Capitano, his predecessor in Andy Valence, Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard, and a slew of medicos. Exchanging information as they supped were Drs. Robert McCord with Barbie, Nicholas Angelica, Dana Fouchi with Valerie Walker, Lori Palazzo with Patrick, Pramela Ganji, Paul Staab, Jonah Ezieme, Anthony Ferguson with Paulette, Michael LeBrun, Michael Puente, Hector Cabrera, Lawrence Giambelluca with Liz LeBoeuf, John Montz with Judy, and the above Susan Donaghey.

    The ranks were abetted by Drs. Robert Velez, Thomas Boos with Nancy, Brian Cain, Denise Elliot, Juan Escarfuller, Archie Melcher, Cynthia Mizgala, Thomas Grimstad, Claudia Serrano, and Charlie Simonson. Prandial choices were three — steak, fish or chicken — with strawberry shortcake capping the savory repast.”

    Reply
  21. Patricia

    Hainkel’s longtime law partner, William Porteous, said that Hainkel had been at a meeting near Poplarville on April 14, 2005, with other Republican lawmakers and was found dead in his bed the next morning. “They were at a camp. He just didn’t wake up,” Porteous explained.

    A coroner’s report revealed that Hainkel asphyxiated. Apparently, fluid blocked his breathing passages as he slept and entered his lungs. (He did not succumb to heart failure, as originally thought.) He had spent his last evening cooking for friends, eating, and recounting political “war stories.”

    ???????????
    I read this a while back when researching Julie Quinn & it stuck with me for some strange reason?
    Maybe nothing, but I”m just sayin it seems odd.

    Reply
  22. Rebecca

    Does any one know what happened to the greek maf who purchased certified lloyds from frances pecora that allowed the aaa building to be transferred back to mamo??

    Reply
  23. euphrosine

    That Kidd knows some sht:

    “Kidd permalink
    September 5, 2010 3:23 pm
    Ashton I thank you too. I have had respect for Elton back to his teaching days @ Kenner Jr High (as well as had for Aaron B. back to those years) but straight saplings seem often to grow into distorted trees not always seen while watching the forest. I am now disappointed.
    Thanks also to sop

    Reply
  24. Mary

    Mobsters Frank Maragas and Aristotle “Tally” Maragas from Canton Ohio purchased Certified Lloyds from Frances and Nofio Pecora Jr. that allowed the AAA building to be transfered back to Mobster DA of Jefferson Parish Mamo

    Reply
  25. Mary

    Yanni Wheeler Dealer Financier from Chicago acted as middleman for the Sale of Certified Lloyds from Frances and Nofio Jr…. Baton Rouge Attorney Johnny Saigo represented Frances and Nofio Pecora for the approval process of sale with the State of Louisiana Department of Insurance.

    Reply
  26. Mary

    When the sale was completed 3.5Mil to 4Mil in equity was infused into Certified Lloyds but because of differences between the Frances, Nofio Jr. and the Maragas Brothers were unable to sustain operations due to a shortfall of capital surplus. Certified Lloyds then was seized by the Department of Insurance

    Reply

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